Home | Highway Listings | Other Highways | Trunk Highway System Map | In Depth: News & Articles | About this Site

 

Highways 20 through 29

STH-20 | STH-21 | STH-22 | STH-23 | MN TH-23 | STH-24 | STH-25 | STH-26 | STH-27 | STH-28 | STH-29 | Jump to Bottom


STH-20

Western Terminus:

Jct US-12 & STH-67 two miles east of La Grange

Eastern Terminus:

STH-32/Main St in downtown Racine (cnr Sixth & Main Sts for ebd STH-20, and cnr Seventh & Main Sts for wbd STH-20)

Length:

42.95 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-20

 

Notes:

The long-awaited US-12 southerly bypass of the City of Whitewater is currently under construction, although the connection of this bypass highway and the existing "stub-end" of the US-12 freeway at Elkhorn is not yet programmed. When such a connection occurs, though, it is anticipated that STH-20 would be extended westerly from STH-67 via what is now US-12 to end at a new US-12 highway coming "diagonally" up from Elkhorn to Whitewater.

 

History:

The Racine-to-Rochester state trunkline has been designated STH-20 since the dawn of the state highway system in 1917. Originally, though, STH-20 continued southwesterly into Burlington, then westerly via present-day STH-11, ending at the Iowa state line near Dubuque. When US-14 replaced the original STH-11 designation in 1933, STH-20 was scaled back to end at Rochester. It wasn't until 1947 that STH-20 was extended westerly from Waterford along then-CTH-K to end at US-12 & STH-67 near La Grange.

 

Freeway/Expwy:

None.

 

NHS:

None.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

• None.


STH-21

Western Terminus:

Jct STH-16, STH-27 & STH-71 in downtown Sparta (cnr of Wisconsin Ave & Black River St)

Eastern Terminus:

Jct US-45 at cnr of Algoma Blvd & Murdock Ave in northwest Oshkosh

Length:

123.37 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-21

 

Notes:

A currently proposed bypass of Omro would take through trunkline traffic out of downtown and around the north side of the community. While WisDOT supports the Omro bypass, it is not currently scheduled for construction, which means completion is uncertain until it is enumerated in a future state transportation budget. The East Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission is working tward the goal of getting this bypass constructed as soon as funds allow.

 

 

The portion of STH-21 between I-94 at Tomah and US-41 at Oshkosh is a major east-west two-lane connection across the center of the state, especially for travellers heading from the Oshkosh/Fox Cities area to La Crosse and vice versa.

 

 

Prior to the major route changes in the Fox Valley in late 2003, STH-21 ended at a standard terminus with US-45 on the north side of Oshkosh. However, when US-45 was rerouted via the former STH-110 from Oshkosh to Winchester and via the former CTH-D from there to New London, it was diverted to turn westerly via the last 9/10-mile of STH-21 where it picked up the former route of STH-110. STH-21 itself was truncated back to its new "first meeting" with US-45 at the cnr of Algoma Blvd & Murdock Ave, however it continues to be shown in WisDOT's Official State Trunk Highway System Maps as continuing easterly via Murdock Ave to its former terminus at Jackson St, which is now the junction of US-45 & STH-76, which replaced US-45 from Oshkosh to Greenville. Official word from WisDOT itself is that STH-21 does, indeed, terminate at Algoma & Murdock, as signage in the field indicates.

 

History:

STH-21 has always existed along the same general corridor, however there have been some moderate route adjustments on its western end over the years. First, when the numbered state trunkline routes were first laid out in 1917 and posted in 1918, STH-21 began in La Crosse and continued easterly along present-day STH-16 through Sparta, then easterly via today's CTH-A through Ridgeville and Clifton to New Lisbon before turning northerly via STH-80 to Necedah and the present STH-21 corridor. East of Castle Rock Lake, STH-21 formerly "stair-stepped" from Arkdale down to Friendship then headed easterly via present-day CTH-J and north on CTH-G back to its present corridor.

 

 

In the early 1920s, STH-21 was removed from the La Crosse-Sparta-New Lisbon-Necedah route (La Crosse-New Lisbon became part of STH-29, while New Lisbon-Necedah became part of STH-80) and extended westerly via Cloverdale and Wyeville on its present-day route to terminate at STH-12 (now US-12) north of Tomah. The direct route across Adams Co from Arkdale to CTH-G was opened to traffic in 1939 while the extension westerly through Fort McCoy was added in 1947, during which the spur route of STH-169 from Camp McCoy into Sparta was assumed into the route of STH-21.

 

Freeway/Expwy:

None.

 

NHS:

Entire route. The portion between I-94 at Tomah and US-41 at Oshkosh is a "Non-Interstate STRAHNET Route" while the portion from I-94 at Tomah westerly into Fort McCoy is classfied as a "Major STRAHNET Connector."

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

State Trunk Highway 21 Corridor (Oshkosh to Omro) - from the East Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission: The ECWRPC is working on a study which "will address the two main issues of public safety and traffic congestion."


STH-22

Southern Terminus:

Jct US-51 & STH-60 two miles east of Arlington

Northern Terminus:

US-41 in Oconto (cnr of Main St/STH-22 & Brazeau Ave/US-41)

Length:

172.18 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-22

 

Notes:

STH-22 is one of those trademark Wisconsin highways which seems to inexplicably change directions en route. From its southern terminus north of Madison to Waupaca, STH-22 runs in a north-south direction, parallelling US-51/I-39 to the east. From Waupaca to Shawano, the highway trends northeasterly, thereafter into Oconto, STH-22 becomes an east-west highway.

 

History:

From 1918 to 1947, STH-22 ran along essentially the same route from US-41 at Oconto westerly to Gillett, and southwestrly through Shawano, Clintonville and Waupaca, ending at STH-21 in Wautoma. In 1947, STH-22 was extended southerly for 55 miles via county trunk highways through Montello and Pardeeville to end at jct US-51 & STH-60 two miles east of Arlington.

 

Freeway:

Concurrently with US-10/STH-49/STH-54 at Waupaca. (3 miles)

 

Expressway:

None.

 

NHS:

The following three segments of STH-22 in Wisconsin are on the National Highway System (NHS):

  1. Concurrently with US-45 from Clintonville southerly to jct US-45, STH-22 & STH-76 near Bear Creek. (5 miles)
  2. Concurrently with US-10/STH-49/STH-54 at Waupaca. (3 miles)
  3. Concurrently with STH-21 from cnr Waupaca St & Main St to cnr Division St & Cambridge St in Wautoma. (0.7 miles)

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

• None.


STH-23

Southern Terminus:

STH-11 five miles east of Shullsburg

Eastern Terminus:

Jct STH-28 & STH-42 in central Sheboygan

Length:

211.05 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-23

 

Notes:

As with many other highways in the state (including STH-22 above), STH-23 is another which completely changes direction over its course, accounting for the southern and eastern—instead of northern—termini. The reason for the direction change is rooted in history (see "History" section below). However, today STH-23 starts as a north-south highway from near the Illinois state line northerly to Reedsburg, then turns northeasterly via Wisconsin Dells to Packwaukee, where the highway turns to run easterly through Fond du Lac to end in Sheboygan. While the portion of STH-23 southwest of Packwaukee is more of a local route, the portion from there to Sheboygan is a main through route. —Thanks to Jon Enslin for the heads-up!

 

 

WisDOT has proposed a change in the routing of STH-23 between Reedsburg and Wisconsin Dells in Sauk Co. Currently, the route heads easterly from Reedsburg concurrently with STH-33, then stair-steps its way into Lake Delton through Mirror Lake State Park, then joins with US-12 to run into Wisconsin Dells. WisDOT's proposal would reroute STH-23 northeasterly from Reedsburg along CTH-H directly into Wisconsin Dells, effectively bypassing Lake Delton. The current routing of STH-23 between STH-33 and Lake Delton would then be turned back to county control and likely receive the CTH-H designation. While the cities of Reedsburg and Wisconsin Dells support the plan, the Village of Lake Delton has decided not to, after receiving pressure from local businessowners.

 

 

A major upgrade to the route of STH-23 is currently in the planning stages between Fond du Lac and Plymouth. From the WisDOT website, the department notes: "The WIS 23 expansion project objective is to add capacity and increase safety by expanding the existing 2-lane highway to a 4-lane expressway from the east side of the city of Fond du Lac to the city of Plymouth. No bypasses will be necessary along the route. The...project is still in the planning stages of development." According to WisDOT, approval of the final EIS is expected in the fall of 2006, with highway design running from 2007 through 2011, completion of the acquisition of right-of-way by 2012 and construction to take two years from 2013-14.

 

History:

As originally designated in 1918, STH-23 was an east-west highway connecting Packwaukee and Sheboygan. In the early 1920s, the route was extended southwesterly from Packwaukee through Kilbourn (now Wisconsin Dells) to Reedsburg, where it then supplanted the STH-28 designation through Spring Green, Dodgeville, Mineral Point and Platteville, before ending at the Iowa state line at Dubuque. Later in the 1920s when US-118 (now US-151) was comissioned from Dubuque to Dodgeville, STH-23 was scaled back to that point. In the late 30s, incidentally when US-118 became part of US-151, STH-23 was extended southerly along its present route through Mineral Point to end at STH-11.

 

Freeway/Expwy:

The following four segments of STH-23 exist as freeway:

  1. Concurrently with US-51/I-39 between Endavor and Packwaukee. (7 miles)
  2. STH-32 at Sheboygan Falls easterly into Sheboygan. (4.3 miles)

 

Freeway/Expwy:

From STH-67 at Plymouth to the start of the freeway at STH-32 at Sheboygan Falls. (8 miles)

 

NHS:

The following three segments of STH-23 in Wisconsin are on the National Highway System (NHS):

  1. Concurrently with US-151 from Mineral Point to Dodgeville. (3 miles)
  2. Concurrently with US-14 on the north side of Spring Green. (~1 mile)
  3. From downtown Ripon easterly to eastern terminus at jct STH-28 & STH-42 in central Sheboygan. (58.4 miles)

 

Business Connections:

Daven Howard wrote in saying STH-23 has two locally-maintained Business connections. —Thanks Daven!

  1. BUS STH-23 - Green Lake. A STH-23 business connection at Green Lake exists, though this business routing is not a state trunkline highway, and is maintained and signed locally (albeit very sporadically).
  2. BUS STH-23 - Plymouth. This route runs through downtown Plymouth along much of the former STH-23 alignment. From STH-23 on the western edge of Plymouth, BUS STH-23 runs southeasterly into town via Western Ave to Milwaukee St, then south one block to Mill St, then easterly via Mill and Eastern Ave out of Plymouth to STH-57, then back north less than a mile to end at STH-23. This business routing is not a state trunkline routing, although a small portion runs along STH-57, and most of it is maintained and signed locally.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

WIS 23 expansion study - from WisDOT: "The WIS 23 expansion project objective is to add capacity and increase safety by expanding the existing 2-lane highway to a 4-lane expressway from the east side of the city of Fond du Lac to the city of Plymouth. No by-passes will be necessary along the route."

 

 

WIS 23 reconstruction project - from WisDOT: "Reconstruction of five miles of WIS 23 from Green Lake County A to Arcade Glen Road in the city of Ripon is scheduled to occur from spring to fall 2010."

 

 

State Trunk Highway 23 Corridor (Fond du Lac to Plymouth) - from the East Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission: "The ECWRPC and Bay-Lake Regional Planning Commission are working with WisDOT and the Highway 23 Local Advisory Committee, representing Fond du Lac and Sheboygan Counties, and all jurisdictions adjacent to STH 23, to develop a long-range vision for the corridor."


STH-00

Southern Entrance:

2 miles southwest of Fond du Lac, Minnesota (Duluth area)

Northern Entrance:

1.4 miles southwest of Fond du Lac, Minnesota (Duluth area)

Length:

0.57 mile

 

Map:

Route Map of Minnesota TH-23 (in Wisconsin)

 

Notes:

While this highway is actually maintained by the Minnesota Dept. of Transportation, 6/10 mile of MN TH-23 actually cuts across a corner of the Town of Superior (southwest of the City of Superior) in Douglas County. Please see Steve Riner's excellent Unnofficial Minnesota Highways Website for more information, including specifics on MN TH-23 (scroll down to TH-23 listing).

 

 

No signs on this route alert unassuming motorists to the double crossings of state lines in the area. Heading northbound on TH-23, signs welcoming you to the City of Duluth and Saint Louis Co are present, while southbound motorists only see a sign welcoming them to Carlton Co 0.57 mile distant.

 

History:

Coming soon.

 

Freeway/Expwy:

None.

 

NHS:

None.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

• None.


STH-24

Western Terminus:

Milwaukee/Waukesha County line (Hales Corners/New Berlin municipal boundary) at connection with CTH-L southwest of Milwaukee

Eastern Terminus:

STH-241 at cnr of S 27th St & W Forst Home Ave in Milwaukee

Length:

7.88 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-24

 

Notes:

STH-24 is a single-county state trunkline, only because the portions outside Milwaukee Co were turned back to local control in the late 1980s. While that might indicate its continued existence in Milwaukee Co is uncertain, it seems the route will remain, as is, for some time to come.

 

History:

Historically, the original 1918 routing of STH-24 began at the present-day jct of STH-70 & CTH-M in Washburn Co, continuing easterly to present-day STH-27, then northerly into Hayward. From there, STH-24 turned northeasterly toward Ashland via present-day US-63 to STH-118, then easterly via STH-118 to terminate at STH-13 (at present day STH-112). The last part of the original STH-24 was replaced by US-63 in the mid-1930s. In 1947, STH-24 was reincarnated along the former CTH-A between East Troy and US-41/S 27th Ave in Milwaukee, becoming an alternate route to STH-15 running northeasterly into Milwaukee. The portions of STH-24 in Walworth, Racine and Waukesha counties were transferred to local control at CTH-L in c.1988-1989, bringing the highway to its current configuration.

 

Freeway/Expwy:

None.

 

NHS:

None.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

• None.


STH-25

Southern Terminus:

Minnesota state line (connection with MN TH-60), 3 miles south of Nelson

Northern Terminus:

STH-48 approximately 6 miles west of Rice Lake

Length:

85.81 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-25

 

Notes:

None.

 

History:

When the state trunkline system was first laid out in 1917, STH-25 ran via its present-day routing between Nelson and Menomonie, continuing southeasterly via present-day STH-35 from Nelson via Alma, to end at Galesville. Within the next few years, STH-25 was extended northerly to end at STH-14 (now US-8) at Barron. Another couple years brought another northerly extension to STH-48 west of Rice Lake, as well as shortening on the south, as the STH-35 designation replaced STH-25 between Galesville and Durand. (Before the Chippewa River bridge was built, STH-35 ran between Pepin and Nelson via Durand, crossing the Chippewa there.) In 1933, a Chippewa River bridge was completed at its present location, and the STH-35 routing was applied to it, with STH-25 being reinstated along the Durand-to-Nelson routing. In 1947, the state of Wisconsin acquired and removed the toll from the Wabasha (Minn.)-Nelson Bridge and extended STH-25 by a 1.3 miles via STH-35 into downtown Nelson, then for 4 miles across the bridge to connect with MN TH-60 at Wabasha.

 

Freeway/Expwy:

None.

 

NHS:

Concurrently with US-8 in downtown Barron from cnr 6th St & E Division Ave to cnr W Division Ave & S Mill St. (0.4 mile)

 

Great River Road :

Great River Road: STH-25 traverses a short segment of the Great River Road during its 1.3 mile concurrency with STH-35 through the community of Nelson.

 

Continue on:

TH-60 west into Minnesota - via Steve Riner's Unofficial Minnesota Highways website.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

• None


STH-26

Southern Terminus:

Downtown Janesville at US-51 (cnr Centerway & Parker Dr)

Northern Terminus:

US-41 at Exit 113 southwest of Oshkosh

Length:

98.15 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-26

 

Notes:

STH-26 is a major "inter-freeway" trunkline corridor linking Janesville on the south with Oshkosh and the Fox Cities on the north, serving the cities of Fort Atkinson, Jefferson, Watertown and Waupun en route. Traffic levels on this route continue to climb, warranting several recent and proposed improvements, noted below.

 

 

The Wisconsin Department of Transportation is currently studying the STH-26 corridor from near its southern terminus to Watertown, nearly half of the entire trunkline route. According to WisDOT, however, planning for this corridor actually began in the 1960s with early plans resulting in proposals to convert the route into a four-lane, limited-access facility. The department also notes the cities of Janesville, Fort Atklinson and Watertown even adopted resolutions in the early 1970s in support of relocating STH-26 onto bypasses around each city. A change in funding priorities put any plans on hold in the late-1970s, although a decade later work on certain segments began again in earnest.

 

 

Lying just five miles northeast of I-90/I-39 at Janesville, the City of Milton is scheduled to receive a STH-26 bypass in the coming years. The selected alignent, "S3 - Near East Milton bypass corridor," will diverge from the current route of STH-26 just north of Townline Rd south of the city and swing easterly and northerly to an interchange with relocated STH-59 and continue northerly running between Milton and the Storrs Lake Wildlife Area within a mile to the east of the existing highway. An interchange is planned at Klug Rd as well as CTH-N just east of the current route of STH-26 with the bypass merging back with the existing alignment north of CTH-N. From there to Fort Atkinson, improvements will be made to the existing alignment. [See Map.]

 

 

The first city along the STH-26 corridor between Janesville and the north side of Watertown to have a bypass constructed was Fort Atkinson. An Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) began in 1987 and completed in 1991 with construction beginning soon after. While occupying a four-lane limited-access right-of-way, only two lanes of the Fort Atkinson bypass were built, with remaining two lanes to be constructed as traffic volumes increase in the future. The bypass opened to traffic in 1995. Two at-grade crossroad intersections at Hoard Rd and Banker Rd remained, while the rest were all grade-separated with under- and overpasses, including full interchanges at the former STH-26 southwest of town, STH-106 and US-12 west of town, and the former STH-26 north of the city. Should the planned US-12 bypass of Fort Atkinson come to fruition, it would likely use a portion of this bypass routing.

 

 

Just north of Fort Atkinson, the City of Jefferson commenced pushing for a bypass of their community in the mid-1990s. According to WisDOT, city leaders officially requested the department conduct a study for a bypass of Jefferson in March of 1996. In c.2002, WisDOT announced their preferred alternative for the Jefferson area improvements, including the "C2 - Near West Jefferson Bypass." This alternative begins just north of the Fort Atkinson bypass and swings the highway northwesterly crossing CTH-W southwest of the city before bending northerly to an interchange with US-18 about halfway between the west city limit and the STH-89 SOUTH junction. The bypass will then turn northeasterly crossing the Rock River and meeting existing STH-26 at an interchange near the current Junction Rd intersection. Between the north jct with existing STH-26 and Johnson Creek, the improved roadway will largely follow the existing corridor. With the proposed Jefferson bypass running within a mile to the east of most of STH-89 between US-18 and Fort Atkinson, one could assume WisDOT might hope to transfer that portion of trunkline to the county and reroute STH-89 onto the relocated STH-26 between those cities. WisDOT currently expects construction to begin on the bypass in 2009 and cost $71 million when complete. [See Map.]

 

 

Yet farther north, the City of Watertown also initiated the process in 1998 to see if a bypass of their city was warranted for the STH-26 corridor. Studies were conducted and in c.2002, the alternative known as "N1 - Near West Watertown bypass corridor" was selected which essentially runs along the western city limit of Watertown and includes a new connection with the STH-16 bypass of the north side of Watertown as well as relocates the concurrent STH-16/STH-26 onto a new alignment between the STH-16 junction and CTH-Q north of the city. Diverging from the existing corridor north of Turf Dr, south of the Watertown airport, at a planned interchange with the existing highway, the bypass will proceed northwesterly crossing CTH-Y and CTH-A before bending northerly up the west side of the city to an interchange at STH-19 west of Welsh Rd. The proposed bypass continues northerly for a short distance before making a sharp turn to the east to a planned interchange with a westerly extension of the existing STH-16 bypass as well as a relocation of the current highway, which would likely be designated BUS STH-26 by the city in the future. From this interchange, relocated STH-26 would continue concurrently with STH-16 approximately a half-mile west of the existing route before merging back into the current highway near the CTH-Q junction north of Watertown. WisDOT currently expects construction to begin on the bypass in 2010, to be complete by 2012, and cost $33 million when complete. [See Map.]

 

 

In a February 17, 2005 article, the Watertown Daily Times reported that a northerly "extension" to the currently proposed STH-26 western bypass of the City of Watertown may also be in the works. Beginning at the northern end of the Watertown bypass, which will merge back with existing STH-16/STH-26 north of the city near CTH-Q, this "bypass extension" would continue northerly before merging back with existing STH-26 at STH-60. The article notes this project would likely cost $25 million with construction proposed for 2014-2015.

 

 

Farther north and outside the scope of the WisDOT STH-26 corridor study (Janesville-Clyman) but connected with US-151 improvements between Waupun and Fond du Lac, upgrades to the short concurrent US-151/STH-26 segment were completed in 2004, including brand new interchanges where STH-26 joins US-151 northeast of Wuapun and where STH-26 splits off toward Oshkosh. [Interchange Map 1] [Interchange Map 2]

 

 

Even with the upgrading of the US-151 Waupun bypass to four-lane expressway standards, STH-26 remains routed through the east side of that city on its original alignment, parallelling US-151 throughout. STH-26 meets US-151 at an interchange south of Waupun, and again at another interchange northeast of downtown, runs concurrently with US-151 for two miles before splitting off to the north for good. Whether STH-26 will be routed onto the US-151 bypass in the future is unclear.

 

 

WisDOT maintains what is referred to as a "mapped corridor" on the south side of Oshkosh showing a proposed extension of STH-26 from its terminus at US-41 northeasterly via Waupun Rd for a short distance before turning easterly to roughly parallel CTH-N for just under two miles to CTH-I/Oregon St, which the corridor follows into the city. This propose route essentially extends STH-26 into downtown Oshkosh while avoiding Wittman Regional Airport. It is unclear if WisDOT has any active or shelved plans for this mapped corridor.

 

History:

From 1918, when state trunklines in Wisconsin were first posted in the field, STH-26 ran from Janesville to Theresa in northeastern Dodge Co. The route generally followed its present-day alignment from Janesville to Juneau, then turned easterly to follow today's STH-28 to end at STH-15 (now US-41) in Teresa. By 1921, STH-26 had been extended via present-day STH-28 easterly via Kewaskum and Waldo to end in Sheboygan on Lake Michigan. By 1924, the route had been realigned and extended to run the entire length of the state. At Janesville, STH-26 was extended concurrently with STH-10 & STH-13 to terminate at the Illinois state line in Beloit. On the northern end, the portion of STH-28 from Juneau to Sheboygan was redesignated as STH-28 when STH-26 was extended northerly via Waupun to Oshkosh. From there STH-26 was continued northerly with STH-15 (later US-41) for a stretch before supplanting the STH-39 designation (now part of STH-15) from STH-15 (later US-41) northwesterly through New London, Clintonville, Wittenburg and Antigo to Monico Junction. From that point, STH-26 was extended northerly to Three Lakes, then concurrently with STH-32 for the last stretch to the Michigan state line, where it connected with the previously-designated M-26. Thus, the combination of STH-26 and M-26 formed one continuous route with the same number from Beloit to Copper Harbor, Michigan, at the tip of the Keweenaw Peninsula. (Some sources indicate STH-32 was scaled back to end at Three Lakes at this time.)

 

 

The era of STH-26 running the length of Wisconsin ended in 1934 with the coming of US-45. Previously non-existant in Wisconsin, US-45 was routed via what had been STH-26 from Oshkosh into Michigan at Land O' Lakes, with US-45 route markers being exchanged for STH-26 ones on a one-to-one basis north of Oshkosh. With that, STH-26 was scaled back to end at US-41/US-45 in Oshkosh. By the late 1940s, the STH-26 designation was removed from 13-mile concurrent segment with US-51 between Janesville and Beloit.

 

Freeway:

The concurrent portion of STH-26 with US-151 for approximately two miles northeast of Waupun in freeway.

 

Expressway:

The Fort Atkinson Bypass from the BUS STH-26 interchange south of the city to just north of the BUS STH-26 interchange north of town is a "Super-2" expressway.

 

NHS:

The following two segments of STH-26 in Wisconsin are on the National Highway System (NHS):

  1. From the southern terminus of STH-26 in Janesville to the southern jct (of three) of US-151 & STH-26 at Waupun.
  2. From the middle jct (of three) of US-151 & STH-26 at Waupun to the northern termnus of STH-26 at Oshkosh.

 

Business Connections:

BUS STH-26 - Fort Atkinson. Site contributor Jon Enslin verified a BUS STH-26 routing indeed exists at Fort Atkinson, running via the former routing of STH-26 through the city. This business connection is, however, locally-signed and maintained as it is not a state trunkline highway. —Many thanks, Jon!

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

WIS 26 corridor study - from WisDOT: "The [department] is studying 48 miles of WIS 26 between I-90 at Janesville and the WIS 60 East intersection north of Watertown. The WIS 26 study was initiated to determine how to best meet the long-term transportation needs of this corridor. A preferred alternative for the corridor has been selected that includes improvement of the existing route to a four-lane highway as well as bypasses of the cities of Milton, Jefferson and Watertown."

 

 

Highway 26 Corridor Study - from GoJefferson.com, mostly containing WisDOT information.


STH-27

Southern Terminus:

STH-35 in Prairie du Chien at cnr Marquette St & Blackhawk Ave, 1 block north of jct US-18/STH-60 & STH-35

Northern Terminus:

US-2 in Brule (at cnr Lake St & E US-2)

Length:

294.08 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-27

 

Notes:

STH-27 comes very close to running from one edge of the state to another. On the north, it comes within 15 miles from the Lake Superior shore, while in Prairie du Chien, SR-27 comes within several blocks of the Iowa state line. STH-27 is, itself, not a major trunkline route, although it does run concurrently with a few other major routes here and there on it's nearly 300-mile long journey.

 

 

A new, 13-mile long bypass of the communities of Viroqua and Westby in Vernon Co is scheduled to be under construction in 2009 and be completed within three years. The bypass, which will cost approximately $40 million, will include bypasses on new alignment for both Viroqua and Westby and use the existing US-14/US-61/STH-27 alignment—which will also be upgraded as a part of the project—between those communities for a short distance. The two bypass segments will be built as two-lane highway while the existing portion between the bypasses will be widened to four lanes. Approval to start buying right-of-way for the project was granted to WisDOT in October 2003 when it was enumerated in the state's 2004 budget. The bypass is needed due to increasing traffic volumes along US-14/US-61 through the area and will also help remove through semi-trucks from the centers of the two communities.

 

History:

The original 1918 route of STH-27 only ran as far north as STH-21 in Sparta. By the early 1920s, STH-27 had been extended as far north as STH-12 (later US-12) at Shamrock and by 1924 it was further extended via Hixton, Osseo, Cornell, Ladysmith and Radisson to Hayward. There, instead of heading northerly to Brule as the highway does now, STH-27 curved westerly to follow present-day STH-77 to meet up with STH-11 (present-day US-53) at Minong, then turned northerly to run concurrently with STH-11 all the way to the Minnesota state line at Superior. In fact, the last several miles in Superior, the route was designated STH-10/STH-11/STH-13/STH-27, and was joined by STH-35 the last mile or so.

 

 

By the late 1920s, with the addition of US-61 in southwestern Wisconsin, STH-27 was realigned south of Viroqua to run southerly via the former route of STH-11 (present-day US-61) to Fennimore, while US-61 was originally routed from Viroqua to Prairie du Chien then east to Fennimore. Also, STH-27 had been scaled back to end at the newly-designated US-53 at Minong. In 1932, however, STH-27 had been restored to its Viroqua-to-Prairie du Chien routing when US-61 was moved to its present routing. Following the end of World War II, a new straight-as-an-arrow alignment is completed from Ladysmith to Ojibwa, replacing the winding route it formerly had followed into Radisson.

 

 

STH-27 was realigned in 1948 to run northerly from Hayward to terminate at US-2 in Brule, although much of the new highway was not "improved" beyond graded-earth. Almost 20 years later in 1967, when I-94 was completed from Black River Falls to Eau Claire, STH-27 was routed along 17 miles of the new freeway from Hixton to Osseo with the former route being turned back to local control. That arrangement lasted until 1972 when STH-27 was again rerouted, this time to the route of US-12 from Black River Falls to Augusta. The former route of STH-27 from B.R.F to Hixton became CTH-A, while the portion from Osseo to Augusta became CTH-R.

 

Freeway/Expwy:

None.

 

NHS:

The following three segments of STH-27 in Wisconsin are on the National Highway System (NHS):

  1. Concurrently with US-14/US-61 between Viroqua and Westby.
  2. From I-90 south of Sparta to jct STH-16, STH-21, STH-27 & STH-71 in downtown Sparta.
  3. Concurrently with US-61 for seven blocks in Hayward.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

• None.


STH-28

Western Terminus:

STH-33 in Horicon at cnr of Lake St & Clason St

Eastern Terminus:

Jct STH-23 & STH-42 (cnr of 14th & Erie) in central Sheboygan

Length:

59.77 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-28

 

Notes:

This highway is a minor state trunkline meandering through eastern Dodge, northern Washington and central Sheboygan Counties, connecting to only one city of any size, Sheboygan, on its eastern end.

 

 

A completely new interchange configuration was completed in 1996 at US-41 as a part of that highway's conversion to fully-controlled access freeway in the area.

 

History:

The original 1918 routing of STH-28 was located in the southwestern part of the state. Beginning at the Iowa state line near Dubuque, STH-28 ran via was later became US-151 to Dodgeville, then ran northerly along present-day STH-23 into Spring Green. Within a couple years, STH-28 was extended northerly into Reedsburg to end at STH-33. By 1924, STH-26 had been rerouted in east-central Wisconsin, and the STH-28 designation was applied to STH-26's former routing from Juneau via Kewaskum to Sheboygan. In subsequent years, STH-28 was shortened to begin at STH-33 in Horicon.

 

Freeway/Expwy:

None.

 

NHS:

From I-43 at Exit 123 to the eastern terminus of STH-28 in Sheboygan.

 

Circle Tour:

Lake Michigan Circle Tour: From I-43 at Exit 123 to the eastern terminus of STH-28 in Sheboygan.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

• None.


STH-29

Western Terminus:

Jct US-10 & STH-35 on the north edge of Prescott at cnr Cedar & Campbell Sts

Eastern Terminus:

STH-42 in downtown Kewaunee at cnr Ellis & Milwaukee Sts

Length:

289.11 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-29
Map of Greater Eau Claire & Chippewa Falls Area

 

Notes:

STH-29 is one of central Wisconsin's major east-west highways and the portion between I-94 and Green Bay is the only state route (non-Interstate, non-US Highway) in the "Corridors 2020 Backbone Routes" system. Because it is such a major thoroughfare, studies were first begun in 1988 to explore options for the route, and since 1992 when the first construction began in Chippewa Co, STH-29 has been in a constant state of upgrading. WisDOT committed to widening the 204-mile long STH-29 corridor to four lanes divided between I-94 and Green Bay. WisDOT notes the cost for the entire project is $450 million with the final major upgrade project completed in August 2005. A downside of being such a heavily-travelled route, parts of this highway had been termed "Bloody 29" due to the amount of grisly accidents ocurring along it. The improvements to the route, though, have gone a long way toward increasing the safety of STH-29, and accident rates should continue to drop.

 

 

The various projects along STH-29 are listed here in order from west to east, beginning at I-94 near Elk Mound:

 

 

Construction began in 1999 on an approximately 20-mile long project to upgrade the route of STH-29 between I-94 at Elk Mound and CTH-J in Chippewa Co near Chippewa Falls. The project consisted of a relocation of and interchange at US-12 and STH-40 near the I-94 interchange, interchanges at CTH-T and 90th St north of Eau Claire, a new interchange with US-53 (itself relocated east of Eau Claire), and an interchange with former STH-29 on the south side of Chippewa Falls. The highway itself is built to freeway standards for the first 1-1/2 miles to CTH-H, then as a limited-access expressway for 6-1/2 miles, again returning to freeway standards from west of CTH-T easterly through the interchange at US-53 and to the former STH-29 freeway at Chippewa Falls. Information from WisDOT states these improvements "consist[ed] of 16 staged construction projects." The first seven miles from I-94 to 40th St (Starr Rd) was completed in the fall of 2001, while the remainder of the project was completed and opened to traffic on August 16, 2005. See Map of Greater Eau Claire & Chippewa Falls Area.

 

 

The year 1999 saw the completion of the Abbotsford bypass portion of the STH-29 project. This segment of STH-29 was built to freeway standards from the end of the expressway segment at Badger Ave, where an interchange was built and the highway swings south to bypass Abbotsford. A combination overpass crossing the Wisconsin Central Railroad line and STH-13 along with a full interchange was constructed. As the freeway swings back north to rejoin the old highway, an eastern interchange was also constructed, after which, the highway merges back with the existing STH-29. Between the western and eastern interchanges, a BUS STH-29 routing was added.

 

 

A relatively minor project on the grand scale, but the "Hatley gas station bypass" in the small community of Hatley in eastern Marathon Co will be constructed during 2005. From a WisDOT PIM news release: "Construction is currently scheduled to begin in late April. Crews will construct an interchange at WIS 29 and County Y and remove the current at-grade access. Construction is scheduled for completion by November 2005, according to Phil Wilson, WisDOT project manager."

 

 

The long-awaited 6.4 mile-long Wittenberg bypass portion of STH-29 was opened to traffic on July 1, 1999. With the exception of one minor crossroad intersection at Robin Rd, the entire Wittenberg bypass was constructed to freeway standards from the CTH-Q/Kildeer Rd intersection west of town, through an interchange at US-45 NORTH/CTH-M SOUTH north of town, a partial (westbound-off, eastbound-on) interchange at CTH-Q just east of town, a complete interchange at US-45 SOUTH, before merging back into the original highway at CTH-Q NORTH three miles east of downtown Wittenberg. The former route of STH-29 through Wittenberg was turned back to local control and signed as CTH-Q. A locally-applied business route (BUS STH-29) was also added, but is not a state trunkline highway.

 

 

One of the lengthier projects along STH-29 was the Shawano bypass, an approximately 20-mile long highway built mostly to freeway standards. This portion of the highway, opened to traffic in the fall of 1998, begins at Spruce Rd 1-1/2 miles west of the community of Thornton and proceeds easterly as an expressway on a mixture of new and existing alignment to a junction with CTH-MMM (the former STH-29) thee miles west of downtown Shawano. From CTH-MMM, the bypass continues as a fully-controlled access freeway through an interchange with STH-22 and STH-47/STH-55 NORTH/CTH-K (relocated), then southeasterly through an interchange with STH-47 SOUTH/STH-117, before merging back with the existing highway almost three miles southeast of Bonduel. As mentioned, the former route of STH-29 from the bypass west of Shawano to jct STH-22 & STH-47/STH-55 in downtown Shawano has been turned back to local control and signed as CTH-MMM. The 2-mile section of former STH-22/STH-29/STH-47/STH-55 through east Shawano retains the STH-22/STH-47/STH-55 designations. At Airport Rd/CTH-HHH, STH-47 and STH-55 turn south to follow a new highway for 2 miles to an interchange with the new freeway, connecting with a relocated CTH-K. From there to the eastern jct of STH-22, old STH-29 retains the STH-22 designation. Between STH-22 and the eastern end of the new bypass east of Bonduel, the route was turned back to local control and designated CTH-BE. A BUS STH-29 routing has been added at Shawano, running along a combination of state trunkline and locally-maintained road. On the west side of Shawano, BUS STH-29 begins at the jct of STH-29 & CTH-MMM and proceeds easterly into Shawano. BUS STH-29 continues east with STH-22/STH-47/STH-55 for two miles, and turns south for two miles along the new STH-47/STH-55 connector, ending at STH-29 southeast of Shawano.

 

 

In 1996, a four-mile freeway bypass of Angelica was completed between Old 29 northwest of Angelica and Redwood Rd southeast of Angelica, including a CTH-C overpass and a complete interchange at STH-55/STH-160.

 

 

WisDOT is currently studying the management and preservation of right-of-way access in Brown and Shawano Cos, from west of US-45 at Wittenberg easterly to CTH-J west of Green Bay. While the "Shawano bypass" was built to freeway standards with access only via interchanges, other portions of the STH-29 expressway on either side of the Shawano bypass section still has quite a few private driveway access points. Also, as development creeps out toward the new highway, additional pressures are being placed on the expressway. Thus, WisDOT has implemented a study on how to properly manage access along this route with an eye toward eventual conversion to full freeway standards from west of Green Bay to Bonduel. [See WisDOT informational newsletter.]

 

 

In mid-2006, WisDOT held a public information meeting (PIM) for a proposed project which will reconstruct both STH-29 from CTH-J easterly to US-41 and the STH-29 interchange at US-41 at Green Bay to improve traffic flow and safety. Three design concepts are being evaluated for the STH-29/US-41 interchange. Other considerations are the intersections of STH-29 with CTH-J and CTH-EB, and the possibility of a frontage road on the south side of STH-29. A final plan will be selected by fall 2006 and construction is tentatively scheduled for 2011.

 

History:

History for STH-29 under development.

 

Freeway:

The following five segments of STH-29 exist as freeway:

  1. From I-94 at Exit 52 west of Elk Mound easterly to CTH-H north of Elk Mound, at the beginning of expressway segment No.1 below.
  2. From the end of expressway segment No.1 below approximately four miles east of the Dunn/Chippewa Co line easterly one mile east of STH-27 at Cadott, at the beginning of expressway segment No.2 below.
  3. Along the Abbotsford bypass from the western BUS STH-29 interchange west of town to the eastern BUS STH-29 interchange east of town, at the beginning of expressway segment No.3 below.
  4. From just east of CTH-O west of Wausau to one mile east of CTH-Q between Ringle and Hatley at the beginning of expressway segment No.4 below, except through the interchange at the current northern jct of US-51 & STH-29 in Wausau.
  5. From the end of expressway segment No.4 below at CTH-MMM (BUS STH-29) west of Shawano to Old 29/Slab City Rd southeast of Bonduel at the beginning of expressway segment No.5 below.

 

Expressway:

The following five segments of STH-29 exist as expressway:

  1. From CTH-H north of Elk Mound at the end of freeway segment No.1 above easterly to the beginning of freeway segment No.2 above.
  2. From one mile east of STH-27 at Cadott, at the end of freeway segment No.2 above easterly to the beginning of the Abbotsford bypass (freeway segment No.3 above) west of Abbotsford.
  3. From just east of the eastern BUS STH-29 interchange east of Abbotsford easterly to just east of CTH-O west of Wausau at the beginning of freeway segment No.4 above.
  4. From the eastern end of freeway segment No.4 above between Ringle and Hatley to CTH-MMM (BUS STH-29) at the start of freeway segment No.5 above, including the "almost-freeway" Wittenberg bypass.
  5. From the eastern end of freeway segment No.5 above at Slab City Rd southeast of Bonduel to US-41 at Exit 169 in Green Bay.

 

NHS:

From I-94 at Exit 52 near Elk Mound to US-41 at Exit 169 at Green Bay.

 

Business Connections:

STH-29 has four locally-maintained Business connections:

  1. BUS STH-29 - Chippewa Falls. The former route of STH-29 through Chippewa Falls became a locally-designated BUS STH-29 route when the new freeway bypass was completed in August 2005.
  2. BUS STH-29 - Abbotsford. Passes through Abbotsford along the former route of STH-29 which was relocated to the bypass in 1999. This route is not a state trunkline highway.
  3. BUS STH-29 - Wittenberg. Through downtown from western end of Wittenberg at Kildeer Rd to eastern jct of US-45 east of town. This route is not a state trunkline and is designated as CTH-Q throughout.
  4. BUS STH-29 - Shawano. A locally-designated route which passes through the city via a mixture of locally-maintained road (CTH-MMM) and state highway (STH-22/STH-47/STH-55 and STH-47/STH-55).

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

WIS 29 corridor - project website from WisDOT: "The WIS 29 corridor is one of Wisconsin's most important transportation routes. It carries travelers and goods between northern Wisconsin's west and east coasts."

 

 

WIS 29 freeway conversion study - project website from WisDOT: "The WIS 29 corridor is one of Wisconsin's most important transportation routes. The majority of the 203-mile corridor is a four-lane, divided highway with a 65 mph speed limit. Currently, the only section of WIS 29 classified as a freeway is between Chippewa County T and Chippewa County X near Cadott. WisDOT is now studying the potential of designating a nine-mile section of WIS 29 as a freeway, from I-94 to Chippewa County T."

 

 

WIS 29 preservation plan: Wittenberg to Green Bay - a newsletter from WisDOT: "The Wisconsin Department of Transportation has started a process to preserve the right of way that will be needed to keep drivers safe and WIS 29 functional long into the future."

 

 

Exit numbers on WIS 29 - from WisDOT.

 

 

Economic and Land Use Impacts Study of State Trunk Highway 29: Phase I - Chippewa Falls to Abbotsford - a detailed and in-depth study by the FHWA of the impacts of the STH-29 corridor upgrades between Chippewa Falls and Abbotsford. Contains a great deal of information and many illustrations.


 

STH-20 | STH-21 | STH-22 | STH-23 | MN TH-23 | STH-24 | STH-25 | STH-26 | STH-27 | STH-28 | STH-29 | Up to Top


Home | Jump to Highway Listings:

  1-9
  10-19
  20-29
  30-39

  40-49
  50-59
  60-69
  70-79

  80-89
  90-99
  100-109
  110-119

  120-129
  130-139
  140-149
  150-159

  160-169
  170-179
  180-189
  190-199

  200-399
  400-894
  Business
  Connecting