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Highways 60 through 69

STH-60 | US-61 | FORMER STH-62 | US-63 | STH-64 | STH-65 | STH-66 | STH-67 | STH-68 | STH-69 | Jump to Bottom


STH-60

Western Terminus:

Iowa state line (on Marquette-Joliet Bridge spanning the Mississippi River, concurrently w/US-18) at Prairie du Chien

Eastern Terminus:

I-43/STH-32/STH-57/North-South Frwy at Exit 92 near Grafton

Length:

185.08 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-60

 

Notes:

STH-60 runs the entire width of the state, from the Mississippi River at Prairie du Chien to Lake Michigan at Grafton. WisDOT had to "fudge" it a bit to get STH-60 all the way to the Mississippi; the first eight miles of the highway are concurrently designated with US-18. (Under "normal" circumstances, there would be little—if any—practical need to continue STH-60 westerly from its junction with US-18.)

 

 

Prior to STH-109's removal from the state highway system, Bob Spoerl at WisDOT noted, "an interesting enigma in the Village of Hustisford in Dodge County: On a state map, it appears that STH 60 and 109 intersect. In reality, there is a grade separation with STH 60 crossing over STH 109. It is not an interchange. However, there is a connection by a short 'Rubicon Street.' It is marked 'TO 60' on one end and 'TO 109' on the other. Rubicon St is WisDOT-maintained so it could be considered a highway. It could also be condidered a spur, a connector or even a ramp. BUT, the point may be rendered moot as STH 109 is another State highway that may be turned over to County jurisdiction." This, indeed, happened, thus calling a close to the enigma as Bob pointed out. —Thanks to Bob for the information!

 

History:

Historically, STH-60 originally existed in 1918 along its present alignment from STH-30 (present-day US-61) near Boscobel to STH-11 (present-day US-14) at Gotham. In 1919, the route was extended on each end. On the west, STH-60 was extended from Boscobel via its present routing to the Iowa state line at Prairie du Chien. On the east, STH-60 now ran easterly on its present alignment through Sauk City and Lodi to STH-29 (later US-16, now STH-16) & STH-31 (present-day US-151) at Columbus. In c.1923, STH-60 was extended easterly once again, generally along its present alignment, to Grafton. It replaced STH-29 from STH-31 easterly to STH-15 (later US-41, now STH-175) at Slinger. From there, it was extended via former county roads to Grafton.

 

Freeway/Expwy:

None.

 

NHS:

The following five segments of STH-60 in Wisconsin are on the National Highway System (NHS):

  1. Concurrently with US-18 from the Iowa state line on the Marquette-Joliet Bridge spanning the Mississippi at Prairie du Chien to Bridgeport.
  2. Concurrently with US-61 across the Wisconsin River from Boscobel.
  3. Concurrently with US-14 from Gotham to Spring Green.
  4. Concurrently with US-12 in Sauk City from the west jct of US-12 & STH-60 west of town to cnr Phillips Blvd & Water St near downtown.
  5. Concurrently with STH-26 for a very short distance near Clyman.
  6. From downtown Hartford easterly to US-41 at Slinger.

Great River Road marker

Great River Road:

Great River Road: Concurrently with US-18 from Prairie du Chien to Bridgeport.

Continue on:

US-18 west into Iowa - via Jason Hancock's Iowa Highways website.

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

• None.


US-61

Southern Entrance:

Iowa state line (concurrently w/US-151) at Dubuque, Iowa

Northern Entrance:

Minnesota state line on West Channel Bridge between La Crosse and LaCrescent, Minnesota (concurrently w/US-14 & STH-16)

Length:

120.74 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of US-61

 

Notes:

US-61 spends relatively little time in Wisconsin when compared to its entire length, from New Orleans to north of Minneapolis (formerly extending via Duluth to the Ontario border), only cutting through four counties. The Wisconsin portion is also a relatively moderately-used route compared to the Iowa and Minnesota segments which lead away from either end, which are both much more major thoroughfares. From Dubuque southerly toward the Quad Cities, US-61 in Iowa is built to expressway and freeway standards, while the route from La Crescent, Minnesota northwesterly toward the Twin Cities is a mostly four-lane, divided facility. For the most part in Wisconsin, however, US-61 is a two-lane highway at present, with the exception of a short portion with US-151 from Dickeyville southerly which is combination freeway/expressway.

 

 

At its northern entrance to the state, US-61 along with US-14 and STH-16, cross the Mississippi River and immediately enter downtown La Crosse from LaCrescent, Minnesota. A two-lane bridge carrying the highway over the river and depositing traffic onto Cass St in La Crosse was dedicated and opened to traffic in September 1939. Additional capacity was needed as well as safety improvements to reduce the number of collisions in the area, so a second bridge across the Mississippi was proposed along with widening the entire route between downtown La Crosse and LaCrescent to four lanes. Construction on the $40 million project began on January 27, 2003 and on December 17th of that year the new 2,573-foot bridge's central arch was floated into place. The new bridge was opened to traffic on November 17, 2004. [WisDOT Press Release]
      As a result of the project, the existing two-lane "Cass Street Bridge" opened in 1939 remains, but has been reconfigured for westbound US-14/US-61/STH-16 traffic, while the new 2004 "Cameron Avenue Bridge" now carries eastbound traffic, a bicycle lane and a sidewalk. Other improvements include:

  • Two additional lanes were added to the highway between the main channel of the Mississippi and the West Channel bridge.
  • A one block are in downtown La Crosse was reconstructed.
  • Cameron Ave is now a one-way street between 3rd & 4th Sts.
  • Cass St is now one-way heading westerly between 3rd & 4th Sts and a left-turn lane has been added at the cnr of Cass & 3rd Sts
  • New traffic signals were placed at all intersections in downtown La Crosse within the project limits.

 

 

A new, 13-mile long bypass of the communities of Viroqua and Westby in Vernon Co is scheduled to be under construction in 2009 and be completed within three years. The bypass, which will cost approximately $40 million, will include bypasses on new alignment for both Viroqua and Westby and use the existing US-14/US-61 alignment—which will also be upgraded as a part of the project—between those communities for a short distance. The two bypass segments will be built as two-lane highway while the existing portion between the bypasses will be widened to four lanes. Approval to start buying right-of-way for the project was granted to WisDOT in October 2003 when it was enumerated in the state's 2004 budget. The bypass is needed due to increasing traffic volumes along US-14/US-61 through the area and will also help remove through semi-trucks from the centers of the two communities.

 

History:

Before the creation of the US Highway system in the mid-1920s, the route of present-day US-61 consisted of the following highways: STH-28 from the Iowa state line to Dickeyville; a county road from there to Lancaster; STH-30 from Lancaster to Readstown; and STH-11 from Readstown to La Crosse.

 

 

When the US Highway System debuted in 1926, the new US-61 routing was to essentially supplant the southern third of the STH-11 route in Wisconsin from Dubuque northerly to La Crosse with the northern two-thirds of STH-11 to be taken over by US-53. However, as US-61 was routed northerly from Dubuque through Lancaster to Fennimore, it was bent westerly via US-18 (formerly STH-19) to travel into Prairie du Chien, then northeasterly via what had been STH-27 back to the STH-11 routing just south of Viroqua where it continued on to La Crosse. The STH-27 designation which US-61 replaced between Prairie du Chien and Viroqua was moved over to the portion of STH-11 which US-61 did not supplant from Fennimore through Boscobel to Viroqua. This odd diversion to US-61's original route was an obvious attempt to serve Prairie du Chien with two US Highway routes. In 1932, US-61 was rerouted north of Fennimore onto its present-day alignment via Boscobel, Soldiers Grove and Readstown, into Viroqua. The former route along US-18 retained the US-18 designation while the route from Prairie du Chien to Viroqua was given back the STH-27 designation—which, ironically, had been moved from that route over to the former STH-11 corridor (Fennimore-Viroqua) when US-61 was not intially routed that way in 1926-27!

 

 

From its inception in 1926, US-61 (later along with US-151) crossed the Mississippi at Dubuque via the Eagle Point Bridge, or, more officially, the Dubuque and Wisconsin Bridge, a toll structure which was primarily constructed in 1901-02. Due to structural issues discovered on the bridge in the 1960s, the states of Wisconsin and Iowa jointly removed the US-61/US-151 designation from the Eagle Point Bridge in 1968, temporarily transferring the route to STH-35 and IL STH-35 southerly into East Dubuque, Illinois where the routes turned westerly with US-20 to cross into Iowa via the Julien Dubuque Bridge. The Eagle Point's replacement, the Iowa DOT-constructed tied-arch steel span City Island Bridge, was started in c.1979-80 and opened to traffic in 1982, thereby restoring the route of US-61/US-151 and directly connecting Dubuque and Wisconsin once again. The old Eagle Point Bridge was closed and dismantled that year as well.

 

Freeway:

From Southern Entrance at the Iowa state line to just north of the Eagle Point Rd interchange, at the southern end of the expressway segment (see below). (3.8 miles)

 

Expressway:

From northern end of the freeway segment (see above) to Dickeyville 0.7 mile north of jct CTH-HH. (5.1 miles)

 

NHS:

Entire route.

Great River Road marker

Great River Road:

Great River Road: runs via US-61 over the following two segments:

  1. From jct STH-11/STH-35 & US-61/US-151 near Illinois state line to jct STH-133 at Tennyson.
  2. From jct STH-35 & US-14/US-61 five miles south of downtown La Crosse to jct US-14, US-53, STH-16 & STH-33 in downtown La Crosse.

 

Continue on:

US-61 south into Iowa - via Jason Hancock's Iowa Highways website.
US-61 north into Minnesota - via Steve Riner's Unofficial Minnesota Highways Page.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

• None.


Former STH-62

Former
Southern Terminus:

Jct STH-32 & CTH-ZZ at cnr S Packard Ave & E College Ave on the South Milwaukee-Cudahy corporate limit

Former
Northern Terminus:

Jct STH-32 at cnr S Kinnickinnic Ave & E Oklahoma in Milwaukee

Former Length:

2.54 miles

Map:

Route Map of FORMER STH-62

Notes:

With the completion of the STH-794/Lake Parkway in late 1999, which parallels the former route of STH-62 from 3/4-mile to within three blocks, much of the route of STH-62—as well as the designation itself—was removed from the state trunkline system. The portion of the former STH-62 along Kinnickinnic Ave and Packard Ave from STH-32 on the South Milwaukee/Cudahy border to Howard Ave in St. Francis was transferred to local control. The portion of former STH-62/Kinnickinnic Ave from Howard Ave in Cudahy northerly to Oklahoma Ave in Milwaukee was redesignated as part of STH-32, which itself relocated off Oklahoma Ave and Lake Dr in this area.

 

History:

In 1917, STH-62 was designated along the present-day STH-23 from STH-20 (now STH-11) five miles east of Schullsburg to STH-28 (now US-151) in Mineral Point. In 1931, STH-62 was extended along what had been part of STH-39 from Mineral Point via Linden to a terminus at US-18 in Edmund. In 1938, the first iteration of STH-62 came to an end and was replaced by an extension of STH-23 from Mineral Point southerly, while the portion from Mineral Point northwesterly reverted back to its former STH-39 designation. In 1941, STH-62 was designated along its second—and final—routing in the Milwaukee suburbs of St. Francis, Cudahy and South Milwaukee. As mentioned above, it was in 1999 when the STH-62 designation was retired, due to the opening of the parallel STH-794/Lake Parkway.

 

Freeway/Expwy:

None.

 

NHS:

The portion from the former southern terminus to College Ave was an NHS highway, although the NHS status was subsequently removed and transferred to STH-794/Lake Pkwy.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

• None.


US-63

Southern Entrance:

Minnesota state line on the Mississippi River bridge south of Hager City (north of downtown Red Wing, Minnesota)

Northern Terminus:

US-2 ten miles west of Ashland in Bayfield County

Length:

182.49 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of US-63

 

Notes:

US-63 is a somewhat minor US Highway route in northwestern Wisconsin entering from Minnesota opposite Red Wing and proceeding north-northeasterly through a variety of small towns, such as Ellsworth, Baldwin, Cumberland, Spooner and Hayward, eventually terminating at US-2 west of Ashland, near Lake Superior. Aside from a short concurrent segment with US-53 northeast of Spooner, US-63 is undivided and largely two lanes throughout.

 

 

Between Red Wing, Minnesota and its northern terminus west of Ashland, US-63 is an "out-of-sequence" route, lying to the east of US-61 for that entire stretch, and actually crossing over US-53, another north-south US route.

 

History:

US-63 was not one of Wisconsin's original US Highways from the 1920s. Rather, it wasn't until 1934—the same year US-45 entered the state—that US-63 was added to its current route. The new designation replaced to different state trunk designations: from the Minnesota state line to STH-64 at Cylon, US-63 replaced STH-46 (which still exists north of STH-64 today); from Cylon, US-63 replaced STH-24 through Turtle Lake, Spooner and Hayward, ending in Ashland at the jct of US-2 & STH-13 (cnr Vaughn & Second). Originally, US-63 ran east from the Benoit area via present-day STH-118, then north on present-day STH-112 into Ashland where it turned easterly to run concurrently with US-2 to the jct of STH-13 downtown. In 1939, US-63 was realigned west of Ashland onto its present alignment northerly to US-2. From there, US-63 ran concurrently with US-2 and STH-13 into downtown Ashland, where it ironically ended at its previous northern terminus—albeit approaching it from a different direction! The odd US-2/US-63 concurrency into Ashland lasted at least into the mid-1950s, when the Ashland inset on the official state highway map was done away with. Other sources have indicated US-63 continued into Ashland well into the 1970s.

 

Freeway:

None.

 

Expressway:

Concurrently with US-53 from just northeast of Spooner to Trego. (4.0 miles)

 

NHS:

From the west jct of US-63 & STH-64 at Cylon to nothern terminus at US-2 west of Ashland.

 

Continue on:

US-63 south into Minnesota - via Steve Riner's Unofficial Minnesota Highways Page.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

• None.


STH-64

Western Terminus:

Minnesota state line on the Saint Croix River Bridge between Houlton and Stillwater, Minnesota (at a connection w/MN TH-36)

Eastern Terminus:

US-41 in downtown Marinette at cnr Marinette Ave & Hall Ave

Length:

275.65 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-64

 

Notes:

STH-64 is one of eight east-west "state-numbered" (not Interstate or US) highways which traverse the width of the state—in the case of this highway, from the Saint Croix River to near the shores of Green Bay on Lake Michigan.

 

 

A project is underway to upgrade the route of STH-64 from Houlton on the Saint Croix River easterly to east of New Richmond to expresway standards, including the concurrent portion with STH-35 from Houlton to Somerset. STH-35 will travel along the new highway to a new interchange on the east side of Somerset where it will depart STH-64 and "backtrack" westerly via the present route of STH-64 into downtown Somerset to its current routing. This upgrade is part of an effort to solve some of the traffic congestion in the western Wisconsin counties nearest the Twin Cities, which are rapidly becoming part of the Minneapolis/St Paul metro region.

      From WisDOT: "Conversion of WIS 35/64 to a four-lane, divided highway began in August 2002. The new highway will run from 150th Avenue, east of Houlton, to 145th Street, east of New Richmond. It will run south of Somerset and north of New Richmond. The project is scheduled for completion in November 2006. Interchanges will provide direct access to the highway at County V, 38th Street, WIS 35 and 110th Street. Overpass structures will be located at 150th Avenue, County I and County K. An overpass will also be built for the Wisconsin Central Limited Railroad. The 14-mile project represents an estimated $85 million investment in western Wisconsin's transportation system."

 

 

By far the most controversial project along STH-64 exists at its farthest western point: the Saint Croix River crossing between Houlton and Stillwater, Minnesota. The existing Stillwater Lift Bridge dates from 1931 and has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places, however Mn/DOT and WisDOT have determined the structure no longer meets current traffic needs and has proposed replacing it with a modern structure within a mile downstream, taking through traffic out of congested downtown Stillwater in the process. However, various issues have arisen since the first proposals including the precise location of the bridge, its impact on the river—designated a National Wild and Scenic River, the impact on nearby properties, and, most importantly to some, the fate of the existing lift bridge. Original schedules hoped to have a new bridge and all ancillary construction completed by 2004, however the various delays have pushed back the projected construction to 2009-2014 and completion in 2012-2015, depending on project funding. See the comprehensive Saint Croix River Crossing Project website from Mn/DOT for complete information.

 

History:

As originally designated in 1917, STH-64 ran only 18 miles from STH-38 (now US-141) at Pound to STH-15 (now US-41) in Marinette. By 1921, though, sources show STH-64 was either complete or under construction all the way across the state to Stillwater, MN. The highway was complete from Marinette to Antigo (although it did run along present CTH-M from today's US-141 into Suring), from Goodrich to Bloomer, and from STH-79 (now STH-128) east of Forest through to the Minnesota state line. In 1926, the highway was routed via its current corridor from Mountain to Pound, with the old routing east from Suring designated STH-157 for a time. Other less-drastic realignments have brought the highway to its current alignment across the state.

 

Freeway:

None.

 

Expressway:

Currently under construction in Saint Croix Co from Houlton to New Richmond. (See note above.)

 

NHS:

The following five segments of STH-64 in Wisconsin are on the National Highway System (NHS):

  1. From the western terminus on the Minnesota state line easterly to the eastern jct with US-63 near Forest. (Note that the NHS route follows the route of the STH-64 freeway currently under construction between Houlton and New Richmond, not the existing highway.)
  2. Concurrently with US-45/STH-47/STH-52 in Antigo.
  3. Concurrently with US-141 at Pound.

 

Continue on:

MN TH-36 west into Minnesota - via Steve Riner's Unofficial Minnesota Highways Page.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

Saint Croix River Crossing Project - a comprehensive website about the project and its schedule from Mn/DOT.

 

 

Minnesota's Historic Bridges: Stillwater Bridge - from the Minnesota Historical Society.

 

 

Replacement of Stillwater Lift Bridge - from the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation.

 

 

Stillwater Lift Bridge - from John Weeks' The Bridges Of Minneapolis And St. Paul website.

 

 

WIS 35/64 project - from WisDOT: "St. Croix County contains the fastest growing population in Wisconsin and one of the fastest growing populations in the United States. WisDOT is responding to this growth by improving the transportation system between the St. Croix River and New Richmond."


STH-65

Southern Terminus:

Jct US-10/US-63 in Ellsworth at cnr Maple St & W Main St

Northern Terminus:

US-8 seven miles east of Saint Croix Falls at cnr 160th St & 130th Ave

Length:

54.12 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-65

 

Notes:

STH-65 is, overall, a somewhat minor route in west-central Wisconsin serving communities such as Ellsworth, River Falls and New Richmond.

 

History:

In 1917, STH-65 was designated along 17 miles of the current STH-33 from Baraboo to Portage. Then, after a system expansion in 1919, the STH-65 designation was transferred to a routing in the southwestern part of the state. The new routing began at STH-19 (now US-18) near Patch Grove and continued southeasterly on present-day STH-35 to Lancaster , then easterly along the current STH-81 routing through Platteville, Darlington and Argyle, ending in Monroe at STH-20 (now STH-11) and STH-42 (now STH-69). Soon thereafter, however, the STH-65 designation was once again on the move, being transplanted onto what is now the middle segment of that highway, from River Falls to New Richmond. (The former route was replaced by extensions of STH-35 and STH-61, now STH-81.) In 1946, all of STH-64 in existence was hard-surfaced, but in 1947 the route was extended northerly from New Richmond via CTH-K to its current terminus at US-8, though most of the Polk Co portion of the extension was gravel-surfaced. The northern extension was fully hard-surfaced in 1950, however.

 

 

In c.1988, STH-65 was extended by approximately 15 miles via the former route of STH-35 from River Falls to Ellsworth to accommodate a rerouting of STH-35 northwesterly from US-63 via a formerly county-maintained highway to Prescott, then northeasterly with STH-29 back to its former alignment in River Falls. Then in 1993, the River Falls Bypass was completed, removing STH-65 from the dowtown area to an easterly limited-access bypass of the city. From the northern STH-35 junction southerly to north of the CTH-M interchange, the bypass is a four-lane expressway, while the remainder from there southerly to where the bypass merges back into the former route southeast of town, it is a two-lane "super 2" expressway.

 

Freeway:

None.

 

Expressway:

Along the "River Falls Bypass" from the southern end of the bypass at 945th St northerly to the north jct with STH-35, northeast of the city.

 

NHS:

None.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

• None.


STH-66

Southern Terminus:

US-10 in downtown Stevens Point at cnr Michigan Ave & Clark St

Northern Terminus:

STH-49, 1.7 miles east of Rosholt

Length:

18.73 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-66

 

Notes:

At present, STH-66 is a minor state trunkline widning through agricultural areas northeast of Stevens Point, connecting that city with STH-49 in northeastern Portage Co. However, some major changes are coming to this highway in the future. (See below.)

 

 

In the future, two changes—one major, one moderate—will come to the route of STH-66 in Stevens Point and westerly. First, WisDOT is currently planning on turning back the segment of STH-66 from US-51/I-39 (at Exit 159) southwesterly via Stanley St and Michigan Ave to US-10/Main-Clark Sts back to local control and, in turn, relocating STH-66 onto US-51/I-39 southerly from Exit 159 to Exit 158 (the US-10 interchange), then continuing it westerly via US-10 through downtown Stevens Point. On the western edge of the city, STH-66 will then be extended southwesterly via present-day CTH-P from Stevens Point to STH-34 (future STH-13) just north of Wisconsin Rapids, nearly doubling the length of the route adding 15 miles. (In an ironic twist, STH-66 once actually connected Stevens Point and Wisconsin Rapids, but on the south side of the Wisconsin River via today's STH-54.) A precise timeframe for these changes is not yet known.

 

 

All of the present length of STH-66 was dedicated as the "Polish Heritage Highway" on May 24, 1998 at Polonia, about halfway between Stevens Point and Rosholt. This highway runs through an area heavily settled by Polish immigrants during the late-1800s and decendants of these first settlers still live in the area. Then-State Senator Kevin Shibilski from Stevens Point and a group of local citizens worked for the designation, which came to fruition in 1998.

 

History:

The original 1917 routing of STH-66, while still in the immediate area, ran southwesterly from the Stevens Point area instead of northeasterly. The highway began at STH-13 in Grand Rapids (soon after renamed Wisconsin Rapids) and proceeded northeasterly via present-day STH-54, ending at jct STH-10 (later US-51, now BUS US-51) & STH-18 (later US-10, now CTH-B). By 1921, STH-66 had been extended northerly into Stevens Point, then northeasterly through Rosholt, Galloway and Elderon, ending at STH-16/STH-39 (now STH-29 and US-45, respectively) in Wittenberg. Those were the 'glory days' for STH-66, since by 1924, the route had been shortened on both ends to their present termini. STH-49 took over the part of STH-66's routing north of Rosholt, and STH-54 supplanted STH-66 south and west of Stevens Point.

 

Freeway/Expwy:

None.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

Polish Heritage Highway - an article about the Polish Heritage Highway by Adeline Sopa.


STH-67

Southern Terminus:

Illinois state line at a connection w/IL STH-75 southeast of Beloit

Northern Terminus:

US-151 seven miles east of Chilton in western Manitowoc Co

Length:

160.11 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-67

 

Notes:

This route is a classic example of one of Wisconsin's "meandering" state highways. While it is generally accepted to be a north-south highway, STH-67 has many lengthy segments which run due east-west. The route itself tends to meander all over the place. One of those lengthy east-west segments was made even longer in late-1999 when STH-67 was extended further west toward Beloit (see History below).

 

 

Updated In Waukesha Co, STH-67 formerly passed through the center of Oconomowoc, making an upgrade to the busy highway impossible. However, a 6.7-mile long "Oconomowoc bypass" was first proposed in 1960 to take through traffic along STH-16 and STH-67 out of the downtown area. This bypass begins with a northerly extension of the 1992 STH-67 connector on the east side of the city to CTH-K, then bends westerly to an interchange with STH-67. From there, STH-16 continues westerly and southwesterly into Jefferson Co toward Ixonia. The highway has been built to expressway standards, with some sections approaching freeway standards. From WisDOT: "Some places... have sideroad bridges with no ramps, some have sideroad bridges with ramps access, and some [are] at grade intersections similar to Capitol Drive." Preliminary construction began in 2003 and the eastern half of the bypass—the portion carrying STH-67—was fully opened to traffic in late 2005. —Thanks to Jon Enslin for some of the information.

 

History:

As it was laid-out in 1917, STH-67 today uses more than 6 miles of its original alignment from Plymouth to Elkhart Lake, where the original routing then ran northwesterly along present CTH-J to New Holstein. This was only temporary, though, as all of STH-67 was replaced by STH-57 by 1921. STH-67 was then moved to its present corridor, beginning at STH-59 in Eagle and running northerly through Oconomowoc, and Neosho, ending at STH-26 (present-day STH-28) in Mayville. By 1924, the designation had been extended southerly to STH-12 (now US-12), and northwesterly via Theresa and Lomira (along its present routing), to end at Plymouth, it's original southern terminus.

 

 

In 1947, STH-67 was extended south along US-12 to Elkhorn, continuing southerly on the former CTH-H to end at STH-36 in Williams Bay. It was 1956 when STH-67 took over STH-57's former routing from Plymouth north to Kiel; STH-57 was relocated onto a new alignment further to the east. The length of STH-67 was extended by 6 miles in 1978 when it took over the southernmost portion of STH-36's routing from Williams Bay to Walworth. About 11 years later in c.1979, the route of STH-67 was extended westerly from there to STH-140 while two decades later on October 4, 1999, STH-67 was once again extended westerly at its southern end, this time via CTH-W from STH-140 to CTH-P, then southwesterly via CTH-P to the newly-constructed Gateway Blvd where STH-67 turned southerly for a very short distance to the Illinois state line and a connection with IL STH-75.

 

Freeway:

None.

 

Expressway:

Along the "south leg" of the Onconomowoc Bypass from Summit Ave northerly to the east jct of STH-16 on the east side of Oconomowoc. (0.9 mile)

 

NHS:

Concurrently with US-12 from Elkhorn to jct US-12, STH-20 & STH-67 east of La Grange.

 

Continue on:

IL SR-75 south into Illinois - via Rich Carlson's Illinois Highways Page.
Illinois State Route 75 - Charles Sarjeant's Illinois Highways Ends website.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

Oconomowoc bypass project - from WisDOT: "The Oconomowoc bypass project corridor is located between the towns of Ixonia in Jefferson County and Oconomowoc in Waukesha County."


STH-68

Western Terminus:

STH-33 in downtown Fox Lake at cnr State St & Spring St

Eastern Terminus:

STH-49 in Waupun at cnr Fox Lake Rd & Main St

Length:

9.51 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-68

 

Notes:

One of the shorter state trunklines in the Wisconsin, STH-68 is actually part of a through-route via STH-33 from Portage to the west, heading to Waupun on the east, where connections are made to routes to Fond du Lac and Oshkosh. Realistically, STH-33 west of Fox Lake and STH-68 form one highway corridor. It also could also easily be argued that STH-49 east of Waupun might deserve the STH-68 designation more than its present number, as STH-49 north of Waupun is a north-south highway.

 

History:

The original 1917 routing of STH-68 ran along present-day STH-33 from West Bend to Port Washington (when STH-33 west of Fox Lake and the current STH-68 were one corridor, designated STH-33!) By 1924, STH-68 had been extended westerly from West Bend via Allenton, Horicon and Beaver Dam, ending at STH-33 in Fox Lake. (From Minnesota Junction to Fox Lake, STH-68 supplanted STH-118.) By 1930, the routes of STH-33 and STH-68 east of Fox Lake were swapped, leading to the configuration we have today.

 

Freeway/Expwy:

None.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

• None.


STH-69

Southern Terminus:

Illinois state line (connection w/IL STH-26), 7 miles south of Monroe

Northern Terminus:

US-18/US-151 (the "Verona Bypass") on the south side of Verona

Length:

40.78 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-69

 

Notes:

STH-69 is a main route connecting the Greater Madison area with the City of Monroe, then continuing southerly into Illinois heading toward Freeport.

 

 

An effort began c.2000 to initiate a jurisdictional transfer between WisDOT and Dane Co to transfer existing CTH-PB from Paoli (south of Verona) southerly to STH-69/STH-92 west of Belleville to WisDOT as a rerouting of STH-69 while transferring existing STH-69 from CTH-PB in Paoli southerly to STH-92 in Belleville to the County as a new route for CTH-PB. In October 2002, the Dane Co Transportation Committee also reccommended existing STH-69 also be designated as BUS STH-69 when it reverted to the county as CTH-PB. It seems this proposal is no longer under consideration as no recent information on this transfer can be found.

 

History:

STH-69 was originally designated in 1917 about as far away as you can get in the state from its current routing: via present-day US-2/US-141 in Florence Co. That short stretch of highway received the number in conjunction with Michigan's assigning it the same number (as "M-69") in their state. It is unclear who designated their portion as "69" first, Michigan or Wisconsin, as Michigan laid out their highway system, patterned after Wisconsin's, within a year. STH-69 remained in Florence Co until the coming of the US Highways in 1926, when US-2 was routed over all of Michigan's M-12 in the U.P., except the loop from Crystal Falls, through Florence, to Iron Mountain, where it followed the M-69/STH-69/M-69 combo. (US-141 was added to this routing later.) The STH-69 desigation was immediately transferred to the former route of STH-31 from Illinois to Verona, then northeasterly with US-18 from Verona into Madison. In 1932, the concurrent segment of STH-69 with US-18 between Verona and Madison was removed, scaling STH-69 back to end in Verona.

 

 

Updated On October 16, 1995, STH-69 was shortened by 1.3 miles at Verona with the completion of the new US-18/US-151 freeway/expressway bypass. The northern terminus of STH-69 was moved from downtown Verona out to the interchange at the new bypass.

 

Freeway:

Concurrently with STH-11/STH-81 on the Monroe bypass at Monroe, between the 7th Ave and 18th Ave interchanges. (1.0 mile)

 

Expressway:

None.

 

NHS:

Concurrently with STH-11/STH-81 on the Monroe bypass at Monroe, between the 7th Ave and 18th Ave interchanges.

 

Continue on:

IL SR-26 south into Illinois - via Rich Carlson's Illinois Highways Page.
Illinois State Route 26 - Charles Sarjeant's Illinois Highways Ends website.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

• None.


 

STH-60 | US-61 | FORMER STH-62 | US-63 | STH-64 | STH-65 | STH-66 | STH-67 | STH-68 | STH-69 | Up to Top


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