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Highways 80 through 89

STH-80 | STH-81 | STH-82 | STH-83 | FORMER STH-84 | STH-85 | STH-86 | STH-87 | STH-88 | STH-89 | Jump to Bottom


STH-80

Southern Terminus:

Illinois state line at a connection w/IL SR-84, 1.8 miles south of Hazel Green

Northern Terminus:

Jct STH-13/STH-73 & CTH-A at Pittsville (cnr First Ave & North Limit Rd)

Length:

163.23 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-80

 

Notes:

WisDOT has proposed to relocate the STH-13 designation to the portion of STH-34 from STH-73 in Wisconsin Rapids northerly to US-10 west of Junction City where STH-13 would then turn westerly with US-10 toward Marshfield. This would truncate STH-34 back to US-10 two miles east of Junction City. From Wisconsin Rapids westerly, STH-13/STH-73 would retain the STH-73 designation, while the current STH-13 from STH-73 northerly to US-10 south of Marshfield would then become an extension of STH-80. This change would likely occur in the 2010 timeframe.

 

 

In modern times, STH-80 connects with IL SR-84 at the Illinois state line, however prior to the construction of I-80 through Illinois, that route was also designated IL SR-80 but was changed so as to not conflict with the designation of the new Interstate. During history, such cross-border numbering consistency has occurred (or still occurs in some cases) with STH-11/IL SR-11, STH-35/IL SR-35, STH-42/IL SR-42, STH-78/IL SR-78 and STH-83/IL SR-83.

 

History:

While not an original 1917 state trunkline, STH-80 debuted during the first 5,000 mile system expansion in 1918, running via its present alignment from the Illinois state line through Platteville to STH-19 (now US-18) at Montfort. By 1924, STH-80 had been extended north along its present routing from STH-19, through Highland, Richland Center, Elroy and New Lisbon, ending at STH-21 in Necedah. This extension ran easterly via STH-19 (now US-18) to Cobb, then northerly via a former county road through Highland and Muscoda to STH-60 where it then supplanted STH-115 from there to Richland Center. From Richland Center to STH-33 at Hillsboro, STH-80 travelled via a former county road then dualled with STH-33 into Union Center before supplanting the STH-94 designation between Union Center and Elroy. At Elroy, STH-80 turned northeasterly via a former county road into New Lisbon where it replaced STH-21 from there to Necedah (STH-21 was realigned at this time to run westerly from Necedah).

 

 

Whether a cartographic error or an actual routing change, STH-80 was shown on the 1924 official state trunkline map as running northerly from Hub City via its present-day corridor into eastern Vernon Co between the two CTH-C junctions. However, by the 1926 map, STH-80 was indicated as bowing westerly via present-day CTH-C with CTH-C itself following the modern-day route of STH-80 north of Hub City. In 1944, STH-80 was extended northerly along mostly former county roads to STH-54—CTH-E from Necedah to Sprague, CTH-D to Babcock, and CTH-L to Dexterville—then northerly supplanting the STH-127 designation to Pittsville. In c.1987-88, the routes of STH-80 and CTH-C from Hub City northerly were swapped, thereby shaving approximately six miles from the route of STH-80. A realignment between the CTH-V [WEST]/CTH-EE jct northerly to Beaver Creek Dr in eastern Vernon Co in c.1993-94 completed the STH-80/CTH-C "swap" from a few years earlier.

 

Freeway/Expwy:

None.

 

NHS:

The following two segments of STH-80 in Wisconsin are on the National Highway System (NHS):

  1. Concurrently with STH-11 from downtown Hazel Green northerly 2.8 miles.
  2. Concurrently with US-18 from Montfort to Cobb.

 

Continue on:

IL SR-84 south into Illinois - via Rich Carlson's Illinois Highways Page.
Illinois State Route 84 - Charles Sarjeant's Illinois Highways Ends website.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

• None.


STH-81

Western Terminus:

STH-133 in Cassville at cnr Denniston St & Amelia St

Eastern Terminus:

Jct I-90/I-39 & I-43 (at I-90/I-39 Exit 185 and I-43 Exit 1) on the east side of Beloit

Length:

123.81 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-81

 

Notes:

A southwestern Beloit Bypass is in the works to connect STH-81 west of the city to a new highway being constructed on the Illinois side of the state line which would ostensibly connect with IL SR-75 in South Beloit, Illinois which, in turn, connects with the new STH-67 alignment southeast of Beloit on the Wisconsin side of the state line. WisDOT's portion of the southwest Beloit Bypass consists of a 2.5 mile, two-lane roadway projected to cost $3-4 million to construct. However, in minutes from a September 2, 2004 meeting between WisDOT and City of Beloit staffers, it was noted "a Westside bypass of Beloit along Highway 81 is a priority for the next five years. It is funded, but Illinois is holding up the process. Beloit would like the bypass built at least to the state line in order to take traffic out of the city, improve circulation, and decrease the use of the interstate as a local road." While it is unclear what the holdup may be on the Illinois side, WisDOT is currently projecting work on the new highway will begin in 2006.

 

History:

It is ironic that the first iteration of STH-81 in Wisconsin began at a highway which would later bear the same number! In c.1919, the "first" STH-81 began at STH-65 (now STH-81!) in Argyle and proceeded northerly to STH-19 (now US-18/US-151) near Mount Horeb. By 1924, STH-81 had been extended southerly along present STH-78 through Gratiot to the Illinois state line, and northerly also along today's STH-78 through Mazomanie, Sauk City and Merrimac, ending at STH-33 near Portage. In 1930 all of STH-78 in the Door Peninsula was redesignated as part of an extension of STH-57 and one year later in 1931, the STH-78 designation was moved to its present routing, supplanting all of STH-81 in the process.

 

 

When US-14 was commissioned in 1933, a STH-14 routing already existed in the southern part of the state. It began at Cassville on the Mississippi River, then headed generally east through Lancester, Platteville, Darlington, Monroe to Beloit, then northeasterly via Delavan, Elkhorn, and Mukwonago to end in downtown Milwaukee. To ensure no two routes had the same number—regardless of US or State Trunk Highway—the western portion of STH-14 from Cassville to Beloit was redesignated as STH-81, and the eastern portion from Beloit to Milwaukee was changed to STH-15, a designation that portion would retain until replaced by I-43 a half-century later. Why only part of the former STH-14 was given the STH-81 designation and the rest the STH-15 number is unclear. Ironically, in 1988 when STH-15 from Beloit to Milwaukee became part of I-43, the STH-81 designation was extended from downtown Beloit over the former STH-15 to its present terminus at I-90/I-39.

 

 

The only other major realignment along STH-81 came in late 1978 when the "Monroe Bypass" freeway was completed and opened to traffic in its entirety. While the primary route on the Monroe Bypass is STH-11, STH-81 also uses approximately three-quarters of the route, departing on the northwest side of the city to head for Argyle.

 

Freeway:

Concurrently with STH-11 along the Monroe Bypass from jct STH-11 & STH-69 on the west side of Monroe easterly for 3.5 miles. (3.5 miles)

 

Expressway:

None.

 

NHS:

The following two segments of STH-81 in Wisconsin are on the National Highway System (NHS):

  1. Concurrently with US-61/STH-35 from downtown Lancaster to the southern jct of US-61/STH-35 & STH-81.
  2. From the western jct of STH-11 & STH-81 at Monroe to eastern terminus at jct I-90/I-39 & I-43 on the east side of Beloit.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

Cassville Car Ferry - a report from the Southwest Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission.

 

 

The Cassville Car Ferry - a page at the Village of Cassville website with ferry details, schedule and fares.


STH-82

Western Terminus:

Iowa state line at a connection w/IA SR-9 on the Black Hawk Bridge spanning the Mississippi River at Lansing, Iowa, five miles south of De Soto

Eastern Terminus:

Jct US-51/I-39 & STH-23 (at US-51 Exit 106) four miles east of Oxford in Marquette County

Length:

116.15 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-82

 

Notes:

For much of its length, STH-82 is a lower-volume highway as it meanders across the hills of southwestern Wisconsin from the Mississippi River to Mauston. From Mauston easterly to its connection with STH-23 at US-51/I-39 near Packwaukee, however, the highway achieves main route status.

 

 

After arriving in DeSoto, STH-82 duals with STH-35 southerly for 2.3 miles then turns southwesterly across the Winneshiek Bottoms of the Mississippi River Wildlife & Fish Refuge before crossing the main channel via the Black Hawk Bridge into Lansing, Iowa. The structure was completed in May 1931 by the Iowa-Wisconsin Bridge Co, opened to traffic on June 17 and was maintained as a privately-operated toll bridge until March 18, 1945 when it closed. An ice breaker caused a jam on the Wisconsin approach to the bridge and washed out some of the approaches and it remained unused for over a decade. In 1955, the Iowa State Highway Commission rehabilitated the structure at a cost of $1.3 million. In 1957, the states of Wisconsin and Iowa purchased the Black Hawk Bridge and reopened it.

 

 

A new, 13-mile long bypass of the communities of Viroqua and Westby in Vernon Co is scheduled to be under construction in 2009 and be completed within three years. The bypass, which will cost approximately $40 million, will include bypasses on new alignment for both Viroqua and Westby and use the existing US-14/US-61 alignment—which will also be upgraded as a part of the project—between those communities for a short distance. The two bypass segments will be built as two-lane highway while the existing portion between the bypasses will be widened to four lanes. Approval to start buying right-of-way for the project was granted to WisDOT in October 2003 when it was enumerated in the state's 2004 budget. The bypass is needed due to increasing traffic volumes along US-14/US-61 through the area and will also help remove through semi-trucks from the centers of the two communities. It is anticipated that STH-82 will use a portion of this new bypass, depending on its final routing.

 

History:

STH-80 debuted in c.1919 via its present routing from Viroqua to STH-33 west of Hillsboro. By 1924, it had been extended southwesterly along its current alignment from Viroqua to De Soto, replacing the STH-101 designation between STH-35 and STH-27. In 1955, when a new bridge over the Wisconsin River opened connecting STH-71 and STH-135, the entire portion of STH-71 east of Elroy, along with all of STH-135 through Oxford to US-51, was redesignated as an extension of STH-82. Why the STH-82 designation was extended to Elroy, then along STH-71 and STH-135 instead of just using STH-71is rather puzzling! There seems to be no obvious reason why. In any case, STH-71 was scaled back to end—as it does now—in Elroy, and STH-82 now travelled along its present alignment via Mauston to Packwaukee. Then in 1956, STH-82 was extended southerly from De Soto via STH-35, then westerly to meet up with the Black Hawk Bridge spanning the Mississippi, newly repaired and reopened to traffic, to a new terminus at the Iowa state line and a connection with IA SR-9.

 

Freeway/Expwy:

None.

Great River Road Wisconsin marker

NHS:

Concurrently with US-14/US-61/STH-27 from Viroqua southerly 2.8 miles.

Great River Road:

Great River Road : Along the 2.3-mile concurrent segment with STH-35 from De Soto southerly.

Continue on:

IA SR-9 west into Iowa - via Jason Hancock's Iowa Highways website.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

Black Hawk Bridge Cam - from the Lansing, Iowa Chamber of Commerce. The image changes every 30 seconds during daylight hours.

 

 

Black Hawk Bridge - high-resolution photographs and detailed history from the Historic American Buildings Survey/Historic American Engineering Record/Historic American Landscapes Survey at the Library of Congress.

 

 

Black Hawk Bridge - from the Allamakee Co IAGenWeb website.


STH-83

Southern Terminus:

Illinois state line at a connection with IL SR-83, six miles south of Salem

Northern Terminus:

STH-175 three miles south of Addison and six miles north of Hartford

Length:

74.52 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-83

 

Notes:

One of the more contentious highway improvement proposals of the last decade or two—STH-164 widening and US-12 through the Baraboo Hills notwithstanding—was been the proposed relocation of STH-83 in northern Waukesha Co. The long-proposed relocation would have begun at the STH-16 interchange west of Hartland, proceeded notheasterly toward CTH-E, then north just west of CTH-E to CTH-EF/Hartling Rd, bend northwest crossing CTH-VV just east of North Lake and merging back into existing STH-83 at CTH-CW/Mapleton Rd. The seven-mile relocation would have bypassed a dangerous, curvy two-lane road passing between Beaver, Pine and North Lakes and the community of North Lake.

      While some communities fully supported the relocation—Hartland and Chenequa for example—others came out opposing it, namely the Town of Merton and Waukesha County. After much fighting and exchanges between the two sides, which included a compromise 1.5-mile project at one point, the opposition prevailed, mainly on their stance that "the road project would needlessly displace farmers who had worked the land for decades," as reported in the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel on April 2, 1999. WisDOT then officially "de-mapped" the corridor, vowing that such a relocation would no longer be under consideration. Unfortunately for those who opposed the highway, traffic volumes continue to rise in the rapidly-developing area, and local units of government are now studying the need for a locally-funded highway in the corridor. Interestingly, some commercial mapmakers still include the old proposed corridor on their maps, including Seeger Map Co's latest Waukesha Co map and their "Milwaukee and Southeastern Wisconsin 10 County Atlas" (2004).

 

 

WisDOT is currently planning a three-quarters bypass of the city of Burlington in Racine and Walworth Counties, which will carry, in part, STH-11, STH-36 and STH-83 and provide a convenient bypass for through traffic on those routes. The project, which is said to cost $100 million, is currently scheduled for construction in stages from 2006-2011 [see WisDOT Project Website schedule]. The bypass will begin at STH-11 west of Burlington in eastern Walworth Co, swing south to cross STH-36, then veer easterly to bypass Burlington on the south, intersecting STH-83 then curving northerly, crossing STH-142 and meeting back up with STH-11 near Browns Lake, then continues northerly to end at STH-36/STH-83 halfway between Burlington and Rochester. A group of local citizens, though, opposes the bypass for various reasons. According to an article in the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, "the coalition calls the proposed route, which is almost entirely on town land, inefficient, dangerous and a waste of money. [The Towns of Rochester, Lyons, Spring Prairie and Burlington] have passed resolutions opposing the bypass and records indicate the Burlington Town Board has been objecting to the chosen route since 1995." However, the project, which has been on the drawing boards since December 1966, seems destined for completion... 45 years later! [See WisDOT's Burlington Bypass Project website for more info.]

 

 

WisDOT is currently studying the 17-mile portion of this highway between CTH-NN and STH-16 in Waukesha Co, "to determine how to best meet the long-term transportation needs of the corridor," according to the department. The three primary reasons given for the study is to plan for projected increases in traffic volumes, to correct evident safety problems and to preserve the corridor for future transportation improvements. A record of decision is currently expected in Fall 2005. [See the "WIS 83 study" project website for more information.]

 

History:

STH-83 debuted during the first major expansion of the state trunk highway system in 1919, beginning at STH-36 in Waterford proceeding generally along its present-day route through Mukwonago, terminating at STH-59 in Genesee. By 1924, the route had been extended on both ends: to the north, STH-89 now ran northerly via its present corridor via Wales, (west of) Hartland and Hartford, ending at STH-15 (later US-41, now STH-175) south of Addison; on the south, the highway was extended southwesterly via STH-20/STH-36 (today just STH-36) to Burlington, then southerly via what had been designated STH-72 to STH-50 at New Munster, easterly with STH-50 to Salem, then southerly again supplanting what had been STH-116 to the Illinois state line and a connection with IL SR-21 (today's IL SR-83). Other than minor realignments and curve "corner-cutting," STH-83 has remained relatively unchanged since 1924.

 

 

Updated In c.2002-03, the state highway routes through downtown Burlington were reconfigured. Formerly, STH-83 entered the city from the south via Pine St, then at Adams St split into a one-way pair, with nbd STH-83 following Dodge St and sbd remaining on Pine. At Chestnut, nbd jogged easterly one block to Bridge St, then northerly across the river via Bridge to Milwauke St where it met up with sbd STH-83 (and STH-36), which followed Milwaukee southwesterly to Chestnut St, easterly for a block on Chestnut, then southerly via Pine. STH-83 was rerouted to follow a realigned Bridge St from the corner of Pine & Robert northerly through downtown to Milwaukee St, with two-way traffic the entire way through Burlington.

 

Freeway/Expwy:

None.

 

NHS:

Concurrently with STH-11 from Burlington to Waterford.

 

Continue on:

IL SR-83 south into Illinois - via Rich Carlson's Illinois Highways website.
Illinois State Route 83 - Charles Sarjeant's Illinois Highways Ends website.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

Burlington Bypass Project website - from WisDOT.

 

 

South STH-83 & South Bypass Corridor Plan - from the City of Burlington, July 12, 2001.

 

 

WIS 83 study [Mukwonago-Hartland] - from WisDOT.


STH-84
Former State Trunkline

Former
Western Terminus:

STH-28/STH-144 (at cnr CTH-X & Scenic Dr) at Boltonville

Former
Eastern Terminus:

Washington/Ozaukee Co line (connection w/CTH-H), one mile east of Fillmore

Former Length:

4.8 miles

Map:

Route Map of FORMER STH-84

Notes:

The Boltonville-to-Washington/Ozaukee Co line segment of the former STH-84 was the last of two segments of this state trunk highway to be turned back to local control. An article from the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel states the Ozaukee Co portion of the former STH-84 was transferred from state to local control in 1992. However, this change did not show up on the official state highway map published by WisDOT until 1997, reflecting that the physical change (removal of highway markers, etc.) did not occur until 1995 or 1996 when the former STH-84 in Ozaukee Co was designated CTH-H. On the Washington Co side, the highway seemingly held on until 1997, ending at the county line for a time until it was finally transferred to local control and designated CTH-X east from Boltonville, CTH-XX south toward Fillmore, and CTH-H east into Ozaukee Co. Unfortunately, precise dates are not clear for these transfers and can only be inferred from various sources.

 

History:

It was during the first major expansion of the state trunk highway system in 1919 when the original STH-84 was commissioned beginning at STH-12 (later US-12, now CTH-F) just south of Alma Center and proceeding westerly via today's CTH-FF to present-day STH-95, southwesterly via present-day STH-95 to Hixton, then northwesterly again via modern-day CTH-FF to the present STH-121 through Northfield and again northwesterly via present-day CTH-FF to present-day CTH-B west of Levis. STH-84 then continued northwesterly via today's CTH-B into Osseo where it terminated at STH-11 (now US-53).

 

 

By 1924, the first iteration of STH-84 was completely supplanted by STH-27 and the STH-84 designation was transferred to a new state trunkline routing beginning at STH-28/STH-144 in Boltonville northeast of West Bend and continuing southeasterly via Fillmore and Fredonia to STH-17 (later US-141, now CTH-LL) near Port Washington. The route of STH-84 remained relatively unchanged for the next seven decades until its decommissioning in two stages during the 1990s (see note above for details).

 

Freeway/Expwy:

None.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

Ozaukee County’s Newest Bridge - from the Ozaukee County Highway Department, regarding the replacement of the 1932 STH-84 bridge spanning Sauk Creek and the Union Pacific Railroad with a new structure carrying STH-H.


STH-85

Western Terminus:

US-10 in Durand at cnr of 11th Ave & Prospect St

Eastern Terminus:

STH-37, four miles southwest of Eau Claire

Length:

23.48 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-85

 

Notes:

Until 2003, STH-37 was joined for a short time near Eau Claire by half of STH-85. Yes, half. STH-85 was unique in Wisconsin, and possibly the entire country, by the fact that it had two eastern termini. For eastbound STH-85 traffic, the highway ended at STH-37 southwest of Eau Claire. To continue into Eau Claire, travellers needed to travel via STH-37. However, for westbound traffic, STH-85 began at the I-94 & STH-37 interchange and proceeded southwesterly with STH-37 to its "eastbound eastern terminus," then continued westerly along the normal STH-85. In 2003, WisDOT "cleaned up" this oddity by terminating STH-85 at its junction with STH-37 for both directions.

 

History:

STH-85 was first designated along its current routing between Durand and STH-37 around 1920, and has seen very little change in the ensuing 85 years. It is unclear when the "Westbound Only" portion of STH-85 was designated, but it would have had to beafter the completion of I-94 around Eau Claire.

 

Freeway/Expwy:

None

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

• None.


STH-86

Western Terminus:

STH-13 at jct CTH-O, one-quarter mile west of downtown Ogema

Eastern Terminus:

Jct US-51 & CTH-D (Exit 229) on the eastern edge of Tomahawk

Length:

32.32 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-86

 

Notes:

STH-86 skirts the north side of Wisconsin's highest point, Timms Hill, at 1951.5 feet between Ogema and Spirit.

 

History:

STH-86 dates to 1919 when it was commissioned along a route beginning at STH-18 (present-day US-10) in Neillsville and running northerly via today's STH-73 through Christie and Greenwood, ending at STH-16 (later STH-29, now CTH-X) in Withee. This first iteration of STH-86 lasted only a few years and by 1924 it was supplanted by STH-73 and relocated to its present alignment from Ogema to Tomahawk.

 

 

Updated STH-86 was extended by 15 miles in 1956 when CTH-A from STH-13 at Ogema westerly and northerly to US-8 east of Catawba was transferred to state control and redesignated as STH-86. In the fall of 1983, when the US-51 Tomahawk bypass first opened, STH-86 was extended northerly 4/10-mile on Tomahawk St, then easterly 2.0 miles on Somo Ave to the new bypass. In c.1991-92, the westernmost 15 miles of STH-86 from STH-13 at Ogema westerly and northerly to US-8 east of Catawba was turned back to county control as CTH-O.

 

Freeway/Expwy:

None.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

• None.


STH-87

Southern Terminus:

US-8 on the south end of downtown Saint Croix Falls

Northern Terminus:

Jct STH-48 & STH-70 at cnr Pine St & Skyline Dr in Grantsburg

Length:

25.82 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-87

 

Notes:

The route of STH-87 between Saint Croix Falls and Gransburg is only one of three places in the entire state where STH-35 is not the westernmost north-south highway (the others are in La Crosse and in the Cassville area). While the routings of STH-35 and STH-93 were swapped north of La Crosse so that STH-35 would be closer to the Mississippi River, this has not taken place here.

 

 

STH-87 and STH-48 run concurrently for the final five miles of each route. Why STH-48 does not end at STH-87 (or vice versa) is rather unclear.

 

History:

The first iteration of STH-87 debuted in 1919 along the portion of present-day STH-49 beginning in Waupaca and running northerly through Scandinavia, Iola and Northland, ending at STH-66 east of Rosholt. (At this time, STH-66 continued northerly via present-day STH-49 toward Wittenberg.) In c.1923, with the addition of many new routes to the state trunk highway system, a brand-new trunkline routing was assumed into the system from Saint Croix Falls northerly to Grantsburg and was assigned the STH-87 designation, the original having been supplanted by the STH-49 designation. Even when first signed, this second iteration of STH-87 and STH-48 have always run concurrently to their shared terminus at Grantsburg.

 

Freeway/Expwy:

None.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

• None.


STH-88

Southern Terminus:

STH-35 five miles northwest of Fountain City and four miles southeast of Cochrane

Northern Terminus:

STH-37 four miles south of Mondovi

Length:

29.75 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-88

 

Notes:

STH-88 is a secondary state highway, residing only in one county—Buffalo.

 

History:

The earliest routing of STH-88 actually utilized a very short portion of its present-day route at Gilmanton—the 2/10 mile segment from CTH-B to STH-121. Beginning in 1919 at STH-37 west of Gilmanton and contining easterly via present-day CTH-B, the first iteration of STH-88 turned southerly via its current route at Gilmanton for that short distance before turning easterly again via today's STH-121 route via Lookout to modern-day STH-93 where it turned southerly to terminate at STH-53 (now STH-93 to the south and STH-121 to the east) in Independence. In 1923, the vast majority of the route of STH-88 was turned back to county control as CTH-B (the portion from Gilmanton easterly was later re-transferred to the state and is now STH-121), while the north-south route through Gilmanton was turned over to the state as a new trunkline highway and was given the STH-88 designation. The route of STH-88 has remained relatively unchanged ever since.

 

Freeway/Expwy:

None.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

• None.


STH-89

Southern Terminus:

Jct US-14 & STH-11 five miles west of Delavan

Northern Terminus:

STH-73 in Columbus (cnr of Farnum St & Ludington St-Park Ave)

Length:

56.55 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-89
Map of Whitewater Bypass

 

Notes:

At Whitewater, WisDOT constructed a 6.3-mile long US-12 bypass of that city which opened to traffic on August 4, 2005 after a 10:00 am ribbon-cutting ceremony at the CTH-S/Walworth Ave intersection. Construction on the $36.7 million (erroneously stated as $115.5 million in some WisDOT documents) bypass began in 2002, a year later than originally hoped. With the opening of the bypass, the route of STH-89 was transferred to the new highway, running concurrently with US-12 from the south side of the city northwesterly toward Fort Atkinson. The former route of STH-89 through Whitewater along Janesville, Franklin and W Main Sts will be turned back to local control. [See Map of the bypass.]
      This new facility was built as a two-lane, limited-access expressway with limited at-grade intersections, but on four-lane right-of-way. When traffic volumes climb—something many believe will happen in a short timeframe—and budget dollars are found, the Whitewater bypass could then easily be converted to full limited-access freeway standards with interchanges or grade separations built at all intersecting roads.

 

History:

STH-89 debuted on the state trunkline system in 1919, utilizing 12 miles of its existing route. Beginning at the Illinois state line, it ran northerly through Walworth and Darien via present-day US-14 to STH-20 (now STH-11) where it then continued northerly along its present corridor into Whitewater, where it terminated at STH-12 (later US-12). By 1924, STH-89 extended northwesterly along STH-12 (now US-12) to Fort Atkinson, then northerly via STH-26 to Jefferson, where STH-89 headed westerly a short distance along STH-41 (now US-18), then north replacing the STH-107 designation into Waterloo. The route of STH-107 from Waterloo to Columbus—the present route of STH-89—was turned back to local control at this time for some reason.

 

 

In 1933, the first 14 miles of STH-89 were concurrently designated with US-14. In 1947, the 14-mile concurrency with US-14 ended when STH-89 was scaled back to its present southern terminus; also in 1947, eleven miles are added to STH-89 on the northern end when the highway was extended to Columbus along what had been CTH-C. Prior to the early 1990s, STH-89 was routed concurrently with STH-26 from Fort Atkinson northerly to Jefferson, then westerly along US-18 for two more miles. The highway was rerouted along CTH-Q to follow a more direct path between Fort Atkinson and US-18 and the concurrent designation along STH-26 and much of US-18 was removed. On August 4, 2005, with the completion of the US-12 Whitewater Bypass, STH-89 was transferred onto the new highway and the former route through the city of Whitewater was turned back to local control.

 

Freeway:

None.

 

Expressway:

Concurrently with US-12 along the two-lane, limited-access Whitewater Bypass expressway from jct STH-59 on the south side of Whitewater easterly to the CTH-P intersection southeast of the city.

 

NHS:

Concurrently with US-12 between Whitewater and Fort Atkinson, including the new Whitewater Bypass.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

Three years, $115.5 million later, Whitewater bypass to open - a July 31, 2005 article from the Janesville Gazette.


 

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