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Highways 30 through 39

STH-30 | STH-31 | STH-32 | Former SPUR STH-32 | STH-33 | STH-34 | STH-35 | STH-36 | STH-37 | STH-38 | I-39 | STH-39 | Jump to Bottom


STH-30

Western Terminus:

US-151/Washington Ave in Madison two miles northeast of the Capitol (cnr of Commercial & East Washington Aves)

Eastern Terminus:

Jct I-94 & I-90/I-39 at the "Badger Interchange" on the east side of Madison

Length:

3.43 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-30

 

Notes:

Modern-day STH-30 is a short connector freeway helping to move traffic between one of southcentral Wisconsin's busiest interchanges—the "Badger"—and the main route leading into downtown Madison and the State Capitol. However, this highway was once one of the main routes between the state's largest city, Milwaukee, and the capital, Madison. Much of today's I-94 between those cities either runs parallel to or actually atop the former route of STH-30.

 

History:

The original routing of STH-30 in 1918 began at Platteville and followed present-day STH-81 to Lancaster, where it turned northerly and followed today's US-61 north to Readstown. In 1919, when an additional 2,500 miles were added to the state trunkline system, a new trunkline from Lancaster southerly through Tennyson to Dickeyville is assumed into the system. With that, STH-30 is rerouted southerly from Lancaster to Dickeyville and further south to a new terminus at the Illinois state line east of Dubuque, Iowa. The route would only occupy this alignment for a few years.

 

 

It was by 1924 that STH-30 was removed from the Illinois-Readstown routing and applied to a new, more direct route from Madison to Milwaukee. From the Capitol, STH-30 began by running northeasterly out of downtown, then southeasterly around Lake Monona via Atwood Ave and then easterly via Cottage Grove Rd/CTH-BB in Dane Co and CTH-B through Lake Mills, Azatlan, Johnson Creek and Concord. In Waukesha Co, STH-30 followed present day Delafield Rd and CTH-DR through Delafield, continuing roughly along the present-day I-94 corridor passing Waukesha to the north before joining with STH-19 (later US-16) for the final 14 miles into downtown Milwaukee.

 

 

Just prior to World War II, STH-30 was realigned onto the route of present-day I-94 from Lake Mills easterly to the Concord area. The improvements continued westerly from Lake Mills to CTH-N north of Cottage Grove, again running via today's I-94 route (although it used the current CTH-TT alignment for the last half-mile to CTH-N). A year later, the STH-30 improvements carried the new highway westerly from CTH-N at Cottage Grive via present-day CTH-TT, CTH-T and Commercial Ave into Madison to US-151/Washington Ave, where it turned southwesterly with US-151 to the Capitol. In the late-1950s and early '60s, the very first segments of what would become I-94 between Madison and Milwaukee bore the STH-30 designation, specifically around the north side of Waukesha and at STH-26 near Johnson Creek. The first segment of I-94 opened near Waukesha on September 4, 1958 but was still signed as STH-30. In 1963, STH-30 was scaled back on the east to the western end of the completed I-94 near Delafield and a segment of I-94 freeway (co-signed with STH-30) from east of CTH-N at Cottage Grove westerly to I-90 was opened. STH-30 was additionally shortened in 1964 to its current length when additional segments of I-94 are completed. Michael G. Koerner commented that "most of WI 30 east of Oconomowoc is now the eastbound side of I-94." —Thanks Michael!

 

Freeway:

Entire route.

 

NHS:

Entire route.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

• None.


STH-031

Southern Terminus:

Illinois state line (connection w/IL SR-131) at Pleasant Prairie

Northern Terminus:

STH-32 north of Racine

Length:

22.86 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-31

 

Notes:

STH-31, an alternate inland route to STH-32 through Kenosha and Racine Counties, underwent a $6.3 million upgrade to widen the highway and increase safety in an area seeing a decent amount of development. The first of three phases of construction realigned approximately two miles of STH-31 just west of the current highway from 56th Ave in the Town of Somers (Kenosha Co) to Emstan Hills Dr in the Town of Mount Pleasant (Racine Co). This first phase was completed in the fall of 2000. The second phase, in two parts, began in 2000 and widened the highway from Emstan Hills Dr to STH-11/Durand Ave in the Town of Mount Pleasant as well as from 56th Ave south to 16th Place (just north of CTH-L) in the Town of Somers. The final stretch of the highway upgraded was the portion from 16th Place to CTH-S near Kenosha, began in 2001.

 

History:

Present-day STH-31 might be a moderately major route in the Kenosha/Racine area, but the first iteration of STH-31 from 1918 connected two of the state's larger communities. Beginning at the Capitol in Madison, STH-31 originally ran northeasterly via today's US-151 corridor through Columbus, Beaver Dam and Waupun, terminating in downtown Fond du Lac. In the early-1920s (c.1922-23), STH-31 was extended on both ends. From Madison, the route ran concurrently with STH-19 via today's US-18/US-151 to Verona then turned southerly supplanting the STH-42 designation from Verona to the Illinois line. On the northeastern end, STH-31 was extended via Chilton to Manitowoc along present-day US-151, supplanting the STH-56 designation in the process.

 

 

With the debut of the US Highway system in 1926 and the resultant shake-up in state trunkline numbering, the portion of STH-31 from Fond du Lac to Madison was redesignated as US-151 (which only ran from Fond du Lac to Madison at the time), while the portion from Madison southwesterly to Illinois south of Monroe was redesignated as STH-69, including the portion newly co-signed with US-18 from Madison to Verona. STH-31 remained on its existing route from Fond du Lac via Chilton to Manitowoc. In 1934, a year when many US Highways were either commissioned or extended, US-151 was extended northeasterly from Fond du Lac to replace STH-31 via Chilton to Manitowoc.

 

 

STH-31 returns to the state trunkline system in 1936 when US-41 is realigned in Kenosha Co to its present-day corridor from STH-43 (now STH-142) southerly into Illinois. The former route of US-41 from STH-43 (present-day CTH-S) to STH-50, which is now part of CTH-H, then easterly via STH-50 and again southerly again via Green Bay Rd to the Illinois line is redesignated as STH-31. In 1947, STH-31 was extended northerly via Green Bay Rd, its present route, to end at STH-38 near Racine with the former route between STH-50 and STH-43 (now CTH-S) redesignated as STH-192. Around 1950, the route was then extended the rest of the way northerly via Green Bay Rd to terminate at STH-32, completing it to its present length.

 

Freeway/Expwy:

None.

 

NHS:

Entire route.

 

Continue on:

IL SR-131 southerly into Illinois - via Rich Carlson's Illinois Highways website.
Illinois State Route 131 - Charles Sarjeant's Illinois Highways Ends website.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

• None.


STH-32

Southern Terminus:

Illinois state line (connection w/IN SR-137) at Pleasant Prairie south of Kenosha

Northern Terminus:

Michigan state line (concurrently w/US-45) at Land O'Lakes.

Length:

325.69 miles

 
STH-32: 32nd Division Memorial Highway marker

Map:

Route Map of STH-32

Notes:

STH-32 throughout Wisconsin is also designated the "32nd Division Memorial Highway," commemorating the 32nd Division for obvious 'numerical' reasons. The 32nd Division, formed on July 18, 1917 of National Guard troops from Wisconsin and Michigan, fought and won many difficult battles, especially in World War I. See the STH-32: Red Arrow Highway page in the In Depth section of this website for complete information and history on the Red Arrow commemoration.

 

STH-32 in the Green Bay area was rerouted on January 1, 1999. Formerly, STH-32 turned westerly from Ashland Ave to follow Lombardi Ave westerly past the Brown Co Arena and Lambeau Field to US-41, then ran northerly concurrently with US-41 from Exit 167 to Exit 169, where it turned to run northwesterly with STH-29. The highway was rerouted to continue northerly via Ashland Ave (formerly not a state trunkline) to STH-54/Mason St where STH-32 now turns west to run concurrently with STH-54 via Mason St back to US-41 at Exit 168. The former route of STH-32 along Lombardi Ave was turned back to county control and designated CTH-VK. (The BUS US-41 routing, which ran concurrently with STH-32 in De Pere, Ashwaubenon and Green Bay in part, was removed in its entirety in conjunction with STH-32's rerouting.)

 

 

Additional realignment of STH-32 occurred in the Milwaukee area in 1999, when STH-794/Lake Parkway was completed in the area and STH-62 was removed from the state highway system. From STH-62's former northern terminus at Kinnckinnic Ave & Oklahoma Ave in southeastern Milwaukee, STH-32 was realigned to follow STH-62's former path via Kinnickinnic into St. Francis, where it now turns easterly via Howard Ave back to the former alignment along Lake St. The portion of realigned STH-32 on Howard Ave had previously been proposed to carry the state trunk highway designation "199" instead. The former route of STH-32 along Oklahoma Ave and Lake St (north of Howard) was turned back to local control.

 

 

New! The Claude Allouez Bridge, which carries STH-32 over the Fox River in downtown De Pere, connecting Main St on the west shore with George St on the east, is currently being replaced with a brand new structure immediately adjacent to the existing bridge. Construction on the $22 million project kicked off at a ceremony on July 26, 2006 and the new bridge is expected to be completed and opened to traffic in October 2007. It includes replacement of the existing two-lane bridge with a four-lane structure with bike lanes, roadway reconstruction, and the construction of a multi-lane roundabout at the east end of the new bridge. The existing 1932 Claude Allouez Bridge will be used until completion of the replacement structure. Once the new bridge is completed, demolition and removal of the existing bridge will begin. [See WisDOT Project website.]

 

History:

In 1918, the intitial route of STH-32 began in Crandon at STH-14 (now US-8) and proceeded northwesterly via its present corridor to Eagle River, then turned westerly via present-day STH-70 to terminate at STH-10 (now US-51) in Woodruff. In 1919, an additional 2,500 miles of trunkline were added to the highway system including routes from Eagle River northerly to the Michigan state line and from Crandon southeasterly toward Green Bay. Both of these routes were designated as extensions of STH-32 with the highway now connecting with the newly-posted M-26 in Michigan north of Eagle River and, on the south, running easterly via STH-14 then southerly via Wabeno, Suring and Gillett to Pulaski where STH-32 dualed with STH-16 (now STH-29) into Green Bay.

 

 

In 1923, another 2,500 miles of highway was added to the state trunkline system which brought, via a series of reroutings, realignments and other adjustments, the STH-26 designation into Three Lakes and Eagle River from the south. While STH-32 remained co-signed with STH-26 between Three Lakes and Eagle River, the newly-extended STH-26 designation supplanted that of STH-32 from Eagle River northerly to the Michigan line. However, the additional 2,500 miles also added a new trunkline routing from Green Bay southerly to Kiel, over which STH-32 was extended, where STH-32 then turned southeasterly replacing the STH-48 designation into Sheboygan.

 

 

In 1951, while complying with a resolution from the Wisconsin state legislature designating a "32nd Division Memorial Highway" to run the length of the state via the existing route of STH-32 as well as extensions on either end along other existing highways, the State Highway Commission effected the most major change to this highway to date. From Three Lakes northerly to the Michigan state line, STH-32 returned to its 1919-1923 route, this time concurrently with US-45. On the south, STH-32 was removed from its route between Howards Grove and Sheboygan, replaced by a relocated STH-42, and moved to completely supplant the route of STH-42 from Howards Grove southerly via Port Washington, Milwaukee, Racine and Kenosha to the Illinois state line, where STH-42 had connected with IL SR-42 (now IL SR-137). With this major change, STH-32 essentially achieved its present-day route corridor.

 

 

In c.1986, the portion of STH-32 from STH-96 near Morrison south of Green Bay southerly to US-151 south of Collins in Manitowoc Co was turned back to local control as CTH-W. The seven-mile stretch of STH-32 from jct STH-57 & STH-67 at Kiel northerly to US-151 was designated as an extension of STH-67 so that STH-32 could be rerouted via STH-57 from Kiel northerly through New Holstein and Chilton to STH-96 at Greenleaf. Here, instead of just continuing straight through via STH-57 into De Pere and Green Bay, STH-32 turned easterly with STH-96 for four miles back to its previous alignment before turning northerly into De Pere. This rather goofy alignment is likely a result of the state not being able to hand back the 11 miles of STH-32 between De Pere and STH-96 near Morrison to the county along with the southern portion of the route. Instead of temporarily posting a new state trunk designation between De Pere and STH-96, WisDOT simply routed STH-32 back over to its former alignment for a few years. By 1989, the De Pere-to-STH-96 stretch was also turned back to local control as CTH-W and STH-32 was concurrently designated with STH-57 from Kiel through to De Pere.

 

Freeway:

The following four segments of STH-32 exist as freeway:

  1. Concurrently with I-43/North-South Frwy from Exit 82 in Bayside (northern Milwaukee suburb) to Exit 93 between Grafton and Port Washington. (11 miles)
  2. Concurrently with I-43 from Exit 100 on the north side of Port Washington to Exit 113 at Cedar Grove. (13 miles)
  3. Concurrently with US-41 between Exits 168 and 169 on the west side of Green Bay. (1 mile)

 

Expressway:

Concurrently with STH-29 from Exit 169 on US-41 on the west side of Green Bay to jct STH-29 & STH-32 six miles south of Pulaski. (9 miles)

 

NHS:

The following nine segments of STH-32 in Wisconsin are on the National Highway System (NHS):

  1. From the Illinois state line to CTH-XX/College Ave on the South Milwaukee-Cudahy city limit south of Milwaukee.
  2. From US-18/Broadway in downtown Milwaukee to STH-190/Capitol Dr in Shorewood.
  3. Concurrently with I-43/North-South Frwy from Exit 82 north of Milwaukee to Exit 93 southwest of Port Washington.
  4. Concurrently with I-43 from Exit 100 at Port Washington to Exit 113 at Cedar Grove.
  5. From the jct STH-32 & STH-57 at cnr George & Broadway Sts to jct SPUR STH-32 at cnr 8th St & Main Ave in De Pere.
  6. Intermodal Connector: Along Ashland St in Ashwaubenon from STH-172 to CTH-VK/Lombardi Ave. [Note: Intermodal Connectors provide access between major intermodal facilities and the other four subsystems making up the National Highway System. A listing of all official NHS Intermodal Connectors.]
  7. Concurrently with STH-54/Mason St in Green Bay from Ashland St to US-41; concurrently with US-41 between Exit 168 and 169; then concurrently with STH-29 from US-41 at Green Bay to the western jct of STH-29 & STH-32 south of Pulaski.
  8. Concurrently with US-8 from Laona to Crandon.
  9. Concurrently with US-45 from Three Lakes to Eagle River.

 

Circle Tour :

Lake Michigan Circle Tour: From the southern terminus at the Illinois state line northerly to jct STH-32 & I-43 at Exit 113 near Cedar Grove.

 

Continue on:

SR-137 southerly into Illinois - via Rich Carlson's Illinois Highways website.
US-45 northerly into Michigan - via the Michigan Highways website.
Illinois State Route 137 - Charles Sarjeant's Illinois Highways Ends website.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

STH-32: Red Arrow Highway - from this website's In Depth section, explaining the history of the Red Arrow commemoration.

 

 

The Red Arrow Division: Fierce fighters of World War I - an informative article, with photos, from the Detroit News.

 

 

History of the "Red Arrow" Insignia, 32nd Division & 32nd Brigade - an indepth look at the "red arrow" insignia.

 

 

The 32nd Division Veteran Association

 

 

Updated Claude Allouez Bridge project - from WisDOT: "WisDOT has selected a bridge alternative to replace the aging Claude Allouez Bridge in downtown De Pere. A bridge condition study in 1998 recommended the bridge be replaced prior to 2008-2010, noting that the bridge was built in 1932 and was beyond its service life."


SPUR
STH-32
Former State Trunkline

Fmr. West Terminus:

US-41 at Exit 163 on the city limit between De Pere and Ashwaubenon

Fmr. East Terminus:

STH-32 in De Pere at cnr of Main Ave & 8th St

Former Length:

0.5 miles

Map:

Route Map of Former SPUR STH-32

Notes:

SPUR STH-32 was a very short, four-block long route running along Main Ave in De Pere, connecting STH-32 with the US-41 freeway on the west side of the city. This route was one of only four "SPUR"-designated state trunkline highways in the state; the others are SPUR STH-42 at Gills Rock, SPUR US-51 in Beloit and SPUR STH-794 in Saint Francis.

 

This short trunkline was not signed with its official route designation in the field. Instead, route marker assemblies along Main Ave in De Pere indicated "TO STH-32" for eastbound traffic and "TO US-41" for westbound.

 

History:

Although it is unclear from current research when SPUR STH-32 was first commissioned, it was removed from the state trunk highway system in 2001 and turned back to local control.

 

Freeway/Expwy:

None.

 

NHS:

Entire route.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

• None.


STH-33

Western Terminus
—Official(?) :

Jct US-14/US-53/US-61 & STH-16 (cnr 3rd & Cass Sts for eastbound traffic, and cnr 4th & Cass Sts for westbound traffic) in downtown La Crosse (see note below for additional info)

Western Terminus
—Signed :

Jct US-14/US-61 (sbd) at cnr 3rd & Jackson Sts on the south side of downtown La Crosse (see note below for additional info)

Eastern Terminus:

STH-32 in Port Washington at cnr Grand St & Spring St

 

Length:

200.84 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-33

 

Notes:

STH-33 is one of several highways which run the entire width of the state, linking La Crosse on the Minnesota border with Port Washington on Lake Michigan. One minor sticking-point, though, seems to be the highway's precise western terminus in downtown La Crosse. Signage in the field indicates STH-33 ends at US-14/US-61 (3rd & 4th Sts at Jackson St) south of downtown. Although, a check of the Official State Trunk Highway System Maps from WisDOT seems to indicate the route of STH-33 officially continues northerly via US-14/US-61 via 3rd & 4th Sts for seven additional blocks. However, WisDOT's Bob Spoerl states the official and signed western terminus should be one in the same, at Jackson St & 3rd St, which means the OSTHSM needs to be corrected to show this. —Many thanks to Bob for the update!

 

 

As previously reported, STH-33 and nearby STH-131 were scheduled for massive improvements from Ontario in Vernon Co southerly. Originally, plans were to construct a new highway, jointly designated STH-33/STH-131, from Ontario southerly through the Kickapoo valley to approximately CTH-F, where STH-33 would swing east for a mile to its current alignment and STH-131 would have continued southerly through the valley on new alignment to Rockton. However, WisDOT's Robert Swartz wrote in to note that STH-33 was removed from consideration for improvements in the area, and nearby STH-131 was to be constructed generally along its present alignment, lessening impacts on the scenic and aesthetic setting through which it travels. Indeed, in 2000, WisDOT removed the "mapped corridors" for STH-33 and STH-131 from its Official State Trunk Highway System Maps thus officially putting and end to those plans —Many thanks to Robert for the information!

 

 

Yet another "mapped corridor" along the route of STH-33 was removed from the Official State Trunk Highway System Maps and, as such, relegated to the history books. Until 2002, a northerly bypass of the communities of Addison and Allenton in western Washington Co had been proposed to run north of the current highway between CTH-U west of Addison and just west of CTH-WW (east of US-41) east of Allenton. There seem to no longer be any plans for such a bypass routing.

 

History:

Historically, the original 1918 routing of STH-33, while utilizing a short portion of its current alignment, was more of a north-south trending route instead of today's east-west routing. Beginning at Baraboo, the first route of STH-33 ran westerly and northerly via present-day STH-136 to east of Reedsburg, then turned westerly through Reedsburg and on northwesterly via its present corridor through LaValle to Union Center. There, STH-33 continued northerly via today's STH-80/STH-82 through Elroy before picking up present-day CTH-H through Hustler, terminating at Camp Douglas. In 1919, the route was extended on its eastern end and both relocated and extended on its northern/western end. On the east, STH-33 was extended along its present corridor through Portage to Fox Lake, then northeasterly via present-day STH-68 into Waupun. On the west, STH-33 was removed from the LaValle-Camp Douglas route and instead bent westerly at Union Center to follow its present corridor into La Crosse. The former route of STH-33 from Union Center through Elroy and Hustler to Camp Douglas was redesignated STH-94.

 

 

In c.1928-29, the routes of STH-33 and STH-68, which had begun at STH-33 in Fox Lake and proceeded easterly via Beaver Dam, Horicon and West Bend to Port Washington, were flip-flopped. STH-33 took over the STH-68 route between Fox Lake and Port Washington, while STH-68 was relegated to the former STH-33 route between Fox Lake and Waupun. The only other major realignment along STH-33 came in 1934 when CTH-E from US-12 three miles north of Baraboo to STH-23 six miles east of Reedsburg was assumed into the state trunkline system and designated as STH-33. The fomer route of STH-33 from Baraboo to STH-23/STH-33 east of Reedsburg was then redesignated as STH-136.

 

Freeway/Expwy:

None.

 

NHS:

The following three segments of STH-33 in Wisconsin are on the National Highway System (NHS):

  1. Concurrently with US-14/US-61 along 3rd & 4th Sts in La Crosse.
  2. Concurrently with US-12 for three miles north of Baraboo.
  3. From US-41 at Allenton to I-43/STH-57 at Exit 96 at Saukville.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

• None.


STH-34

Southern Terminus:

JCt STH-13/STH-73 in central Wisconsin Rapids at cnr W Grand Ave & Riverview Expwy

Northern Terminus:

US-51/I-39 at Exit 175 near Knowlton

Length:

29.57 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-34

 

Notes:

WisDOT has proposed to relocate the STH-13 designation to the portion of STH-34 from STH-73 in Wisconsin Rapids northerly to US-10 west of Junction City where STH-13 would then turn westerly toward Marshfield. This would truncate STH-34 back to US-10 two miles east of Junction City and reports have stated STH-34 between US-10 and US-51/I-39 will remain a state trunkline in the future. This change would likely occur in the 2010 timeframe.

 

History:

The original 1918 routing of STH-34 ran along what later became US-10 from the Minnesota state line at Prescott to STH-37 in Mondovi. In the early-1920s, the portion of present-day US-10 which was not already designated as part of STH-18 received that designation, completely replacing STH-34 between Prescott and Mondovi. The STH-34 designation was relocated to a new state trunkline highway between Berlin and Butte des Morts via Omro west of Oshkosh. (This route later became STH-116.)

 

 

In 1926 when the US Highway system debuted, the state received a portion of the US-18 routing, and since Wisconsin wanted no two highways to possess the same route number—regardless of State or US Highway type—the STH-18 designation had to go. From Fairchild to Manitowoc, this was not a problem, as US-10 was designated to run along that portion of the route. However, between Prescott and Fairchild—including the 1918 routing of STH-34—did not initially receive the US-10 designation (it was co-signed with US-12 through Eau Claire, Menomonie and Hudson), and was "given back" STH-34. In late-1934 when US-45 was extended through Wisconsin, STH-45 between Wisconsin Rapids and Knowlton had to surrender its route number, and the STH-34 designation was transferred to its routing. It is believed this was the reason US-10 was rerouted to the south of US-12 between Fairchild and St Paul, Minn, as it remains today. (In the general numbering scheme, US-10 should always run north of US-12, not south of it.)

 

Freeway/Expwy:

None.

 

NHS:

From jct STH-13/STH-73 in Wisconsin Rapids to the eastern jct of US-10 & STH-34 east of Junction City.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

WisDOT schedules WIS 13, WIS 80 reroute public information meeting - from WisDOT.


STH-35

Southern Terminus:

Illinois state line (at connection w/IL SR-35) six miles south of Kieler

Northern Terminus:

Jct I-535 & US-53 in Superior, at the southern end of the Blatnik Bridge leading to Duluth MN

Length:

412.15 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-35

 

Notes:

STH-35 carries the distinction of being Wisconsin's longest state highway, clocking in at more than 412 miles, which is almost 64 miles longer than the state's second-longest state highway, I-94, at 348.4 miles long. STH-35 accomplishes this, in part, by running the entire length of the state, parallelling its western border for its entire length, oftentimes following within a mile or two. In fact, this route is generally the westernmost north-south state highway in Wisconsin, with the only exceptions being from Bloomington to Tennyson, through La Crosse, and from St Croix Falls to Siren. In recent years, STH-35 has actually been realigned closer to, in these cases, the Mississippi River. In the Trempealeau area, STH-35 and STH-93 swapped routings in c.1990 so STH-35 could run closer to the river and bear the Great River Road routing there. In Pierce Co, STH-35 was routed in c.1988 northwesterly from US-63 along a formerly county-maintained highway to Prescott, then northeasterly with STH-29 back to its former alignment in River Falls. (STH-65 replaced STH-35 from Ellsworth to River Falls.)

 

 

In 1998, STH-35 was relocated approximately 1/4 mile west of is former alignment beginning at I-94 east of Hudson and heading southerly for about 1-1/2 miles, merging back with the former highway north of CTH-FF. The project included a new interchange with I-94 just west of the former one.

 

 

In March 2005, WisDOT began holding Public Information Meetings in the River Falls area to gather public input on their proposal to convert the STH-35 expressway between River Falls and I-94/US-12 at Hudson to a fully controlled-access freeway. The expressway project completed in 1998 makes upgrading this portion of the highway to freeway standards a matter of simply closing certain private access, building a few overpasses and the like. No timetable has been established for this project, however.

 

 

A project is underway to upgrade the route of STH-64 from Houlton on the St Croix River easterly to east of New Richmond to expresway standards, including the concurrent portion with STH-35 from Houlton to Somerset. STH-35 will travel along the new highway to a new interchange on the east side of Somerset where it will depart STH-64 and "backtrack" westerly via the present route of STH-64 into downtown Somerset where it will turn northerly along its current routing.

      From WisDOT: "Conversion of WIS 35/64 to a four-lane, divided highway began in August 2002. The new highway will run from 150th Avenue, east of Houlton, to 145th Street, east of New Richmond. It will run south of Somerset and north of New Richmond. The project is scheduled for completion in November 2006. Interchanges will provide direct access to the highway at County V, 38th Street, WIS 35 and 110th Street. Overpass structures will be located at 150th Avenue, County I and County K. An overpass will also be built for the Wisconsin Central Limited Railroad. The 14-mile project represents an estimated $85 million investment in western Wisconsin's transportation system."

 

History:

While the routing of STH-35 is impressive today, its beginnings in 1918 were less so, beginning at STH-14 (now US-8) near St Croix Falls and ending at Danbury in Burnett Co, a distance of only about 45 miles! By 1921, the highway had been extended south to STH-64 at Somerset, and was in the process of being extended northerly into Superior. Within a few short years later, STH-35 had been extended southerly generally along its present corridor to the Illinois state line near Dubuque, Iowa. Various realignments and adjustments over the years, of course, have brought it to is present routing.

 

Freeway:

The following two segments of STH-35 exist as freeway:

  1. Concurrently with US-53 between Holmen at jct US-53/STH-93 & STH-35 three miles north of Holmen. (3 miles)
  2. Concurrently with I-94/US-12 between Hudson at Exit 1 to Exit 4. (4 miles)

 

Expressway:

The following three segments of STH-35 exist as expressway:

  1. Concurrently with US-61/US-151 between jct US-61/US-151 & STH-11 south of Kieler to Dickeyville. (~5 miles)
  2. From jct STH-29, STH-35 & STH-65 on the east side of River Falls northerly to jct I-94/US-12 at Exit 4 east of Hudson. (9.3 miles)
  3. From the western jct of STH-35 & STH-64 at Houlton to the east side of Somerset at the eastern jct of STH-35 & STH-64 — UNDER CONSTRUCTION. (~9 miles)

 

NHS:

The following seven segments of STH-35 in Wisconsin are on the National Highway System (NHS):

  1. From jct US-61/US-151, STH-11 & STH-35 south of Kieler to jct US-61/STH-35 & STH-129 south of Lancaster.
  2. Concurrently with US-61 from Patch Grove to Prairie du Chien.
  3. From jct US-14/US-61 on the south side of La Crosse northerly through the city to jct I-90, US-53 & STH-35 on the north side of the city.
  4. From jct US-53 in Holmen to jct STH-35, STH-54 & STH-93 in Centerville.
  5. From jct STH-29, STH-35 & STH-65 in River Falls to the eastern jct of STH-35 & STH-64 in Somerset.
  6. Concurrently with US-8 from western jct of US-8 & STH-35 in St Croix Falls easterly to eastern jct of US-8 & STH-35 four miles east.
  7. From US-2 in downtown Superior to northern terminus at I-535/US-53.

Great River Road

Great River Road:

Great River Road runs via STH-35 over the following three segments:

  1. From the southern terminus of STH-35 at the Illinois state line to jct US-61 & STH-133 at Tennyson.
  2. From CTH-C just south of Bridgeport to jct US-14/US-61 & STH-35 in southern La Crosse (cnr South Ave & West Ave).
  3. From Jct US-53 & STH-35 in northern La Crosse (cnr Rose St & W George St) to US-10 in Prescott.

 

Business Connection:

BUS STH-35 - Holmen: A locally-designated and locally-maintained route signed along CTH-HD/Holmen Dr (where the "H" and "D" stand for Holmen Dr), running through the village of Holmen in La Crosse Co. This is not a state trunkline highway. CTH-HD runs along the former route of US-53/STH-35 through the village, and the BUS STH-35 routing begins at the US-53 & STH-35 interchange south of town and ends at the US-53, STH-35 & STH-93 interchange north of town. It is interesting to point out that the local authorities chose a BUS STH-35 routing instead of a BUS US-53 designation...

 

Continue on:

IL SR-35 south into Illinois - Rich Carlson's Illinois Highways website.
Illinois State Route 35 - Charles Sarjeant's Illinois Highways Ends website.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

WIS 35/64 project - from WisDOT: "St. Croix County contains the fastest growing population in Wisconsin and one of the fastest growing populations in the United States. WisDOT is responding to this growth by improving the transportation system between the St. Croix River and New Richmond."


STH-36

Southern Terminus:

STH-120 in Springfield, north of Lake Geneva

Northern Terminus:

STH-241 (cnr Loomis Rd & S 27th St) on the south side of Milwaukee

Length:

35.89 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-36

 

Notes:

WisDOT is currently planning a three-quarters bypass of the city of Burlington in Racine and Walworth Counties, which will carry, in part, STH-11, STH-36 and STH-83 and provide a convenient bypass for through traffic on those routes. The project, which is said to cost $100 million, is currently scheduled for construction in stages from 2006-2011 [see WisDOT Project Website schedule]. The bypass will begin at STH-11 west of Burlington in eastern Walworth Co, swing south to cross STH-36, then veer easterly to bypass Burlington on the south, intersecting STH-83 then curving northerly, crossing STH-142 and meeting back up with STH-11 near Browns Lake, then continues northerly to end at STH-36/STH-83 halfway between Burlington and Rochester. A group of local citizens, though, opposes the bypass for various reasons. According to an article in the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, "the coalition calls the proposed route, which is almost entirely on town land, inefficient, dangerous and a waste of money. [The Towns of Rochester, Lyons, Spring Prairie and Burlington] have passed resolutions opposing the bypass and records indicate the Burlington Town Board has been objecting to the chosen route since 1995." However, the project, which has been on the drawing boards since December 1966, seems destined for completion... 45 years later! [See WisDOT's Burlington Bypass Project website for more info.]

 

 

As an interesting bit of trivia, the length of STH-36 essentially equals the highway's route designation; "36" miles long (rounded from 35.89) = STH-"36". This type of thing does not occur very often!

 

History:

STH-36 is somewhat odd as it has undergone relatively few route changes since originally being designated along its current corridor in 1918. While it originally began in Lake Geneva about four miles south of its present southern terminus and extended past S 27th St to a point roughly at today's intersection of STH-32/1st St & Scott St south of downtown Milwaukee, the route has changed little. By 1921, STH-36 had been scaled back in Milwaukee to end at STH-57/S 27th St (later US-41, now STH-241). Then during the first 5,000-mile state trunkline additions in 1919, STH-36 was extended westerly via STH-50 from Lake Geneva and entered Williams Bay via today's Geneva St, then continued southwesterly into Walworth where it joined with STH-89 (now US-14) for the last few miles to the Illinois state line.

 

 

The route of STH-36 remained relatively stable until 1968 when the portion of the route via Geneva St in Williams Bay east of STH-67 was turned back to local control and the remainder of STH-36 from Williams Bay to Walworth was redesignated as an extension of STH-67. Thus, STH-36 was truncated back to Lake Geneva. Then in c.1987-88, STH-120 was extended northerly from Lake Geneva via STH-36 to Springfield then northerly along CTH-G toward East Troy, which resulted in a further truncation of STH-36 to its present southern terminus.

 

Freeway/Expwy:

None.

 

NHS:

From the northern end of the Burlington Bypass project at Burlington to I-43/I-894 at Exit 8 in Greenfield.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

Burlington Bypass Project website - from WisDOT.


STH-37

Southern Terminus:

STH-35 two miles northwest of Alma

Northern Terminus:

US-12/Clairemont Ave in Eau Claire

Length:

42.67 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-37

 

Notes:

Until 2003, STH-37 was joined for a short time near Eau Claire by half of STH-85. Yes, half. STH-85 was unique in Wisconsin, and possibly the entire country, by the fact that it had two eastern termini. For eastbound STH-85 traffic, the highway ended at STH-37 southwest of Eau Claire. To continue into Eau Claire, travellers needed to travel via STH-37. However, for westbound traffic, STH-85 began at the I-94 & STH-37 interchange and proceeded southwesterly via STH-37 to its "eastbound eastern terminus," then continued westerly along the normal STH-85. In 2003, WisDOT "cleaned up" this oddity by terminating STH-85 at its junction with STH-37 for both directions.

 

History:

Other than minor realignments over the decades, STH-37 has remained in its present corridor between Alma and Eau Claire since originally designated and signed in 1918. In the mid-1940s, when the US-12/Clairemont Ave bypass of Eau Claire was completed and opened to traffic, STH-37 was truncated to the new bypass route instead of continuing into downtown Eau Claire.

 

Freeway/Expwy:

None.

 

NHS:

From I-94 at Exit 65 to US-12/Clairemont Ave in Eau Claire.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

• None.


STH-38

Southern Terminus:

STH-32 at cnr State St & Main St in downtown Racine

Northern Terminus:

STH-59 at cnr of 5th St & National Ave (for northbound STH-38) and cnr 6th St & National Ave (for southbound STH-38) in Milwaukee south of downtown (See second note below in the "Notes" section.)

Length:

25.33 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-38

 

Notes:

For its northernmost four miles in Milwaukee Co, STH-38 closely follows the I-94/I-43/US-41/North-South Frwy, coming within five or less blocks of the freeway in this entire stretch.

 

 

Site contributor Mark Hintz wrote in with an interesting find. For many years, the northernmost three blocks of the route of STH-38 in Milwaukee have run along a split route consisting of a one-way pair of streets. At Washington St (quite literally underneath the I-94/I-43/US-41/North-South Frwy overpass), northbound STH-38 traffic turned easterly for one block via Washington then turned northerly again for the last three blocks along 5th St, which carried one-way traffic northbound to National Ave. Southbound STH-38 began at National Ave one block to the west and proceeded southerly via 6th St, also signed one-way, to Washington where it was joined by the northbound side of the route. At some point, the City of Milwaukee re-signed both 5th and 6th Sts for two-way traffic, although officially in the eyes of WisDOT the route of STH-38 did not change. Thus, northbound traffic along STH-38/6th St is no longer forced to turn easterly via Washington St and can continue straight through on 6th for the final three blocks to National Ave. Mark, however, found there is still an "END STH-38" route marker assembly posted on northbound 5th St at National Ave. So, the northern terminus here continues to feature the official route of STH-38, even if the modern day de facto terminus could be considered to be at 6th & National. —Many thanks to Mark Hintz for his legwork!

 

History:

The first iteration of STH-38, from 1918, ran along today's US-141 corridor from STH-15 (now US-41) at Abrams north of Green Bay via Pound and Crivitz, ending at Wausaukee. At this time, no state trunkline continued northerly toward Iron Mountain, Michigan. During the 1919 addition of 5,000 more miles to the state trunkline system, the route northerly from Wausaukee via Amberg and Pembine to Niagara and across the Menominee River into Quinnisec, Michigan (east of Iron Mountain) was added and became an extension of STH-38. This was to be short-lived, however, as by 1924 the STH-57 designation had been extended northerly from Green Bay to Abrams and then replaced the STH-38 desgination in its entirety to Niagara.

 

 

At that time, the STH-38 designation was transferred to southeastern Wisconsin onto a new state trunkline route beginning in downtown Racine and heading northwesterly then northerly along its present route into Milwaukee Co, where it terminated at STH-100/Ryan Rd. In 1947, the northerly extension of STH-38 from STH-100 via Howell Ave, Chase Ave and 6th St brought the highway to its present terminus at STH-59/National Ave.

 

Freeway/Expwy:

None.

 

NHS:

From the southern terminus of STH-38 at STH-32 in downtown Racine northerly to the Racine/Milwaukee Co line.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

WIS 38 Study - project website from WisDOT.


I-039

Southern Entrance:

Illinois state line, concurrently with I-90, at Beloit

Northern Terminus:

Southern jct of US-51 & STH-29 at Exit 187 at Rothschild, southwest of Wausau

Length:

183.5 miles (See note #2 below)

 

Map:

Route Map of I-39

 

Notes:

I-39 is not only the state's newest Interstate designation, but one with some problems of legitimacy according to some. With the exception of the short stretch of present-day I-39 from the Cascade Interchange south of Portage to the US-51 interchange north of Portage, I-39 duplicates other existing highways in its entirety. Beginning in the late-1960s and finally wrapping up in the mid-1980s, the US-51 freeway was built from Portage to Wausau in the central portion of the state. For nearly a decade after that, US-51 served as a freeway connection from central Wisconsin cities to the rest of the nation's Interstate system until civic leaders in the area convinced federal officials to allow I-39 to be posted along the route as well to help spur "economic development" in the region. No physical changes to the route occurred, other than the addition of hundreds of new route markers, as US-51 remains signed along the corridor as it has for decades. Then, in an effort to add a bit more legitimacy to the route, it was "connected" with Illinois' version of I-39 running from Bloomington/Normal northerly to Rockford by means of a triple-concurrency with I-90/I-94 between Portage and Madison and a dual-concurrency with I-90 from Madison to Rockford.

 

 

According to the WisDOT publication "Official State Trunk Highway System Maps," I-39 was officially designated on October 16, 1992. However, the actual changeover to I-39 in real life came four years later when the I-39 route markers were erected between Portage and Rothschild in 1996. More than two years would pass until WisDOT began erecting I-39 route marker assemblies along I-90/I-94 between Portage and Madison and along I-90 from Madison to the Illinois state line (this added about 79.5 miles to the routing). I-39 now enters Wisconsin from Illinois and runs northerly to a terminus at Rothschild near Wausau, navigationally if not officially. (The last available official WisDOT mileage listing for I-39 pegged the route at 104.06 miles, the distance from I-90/I-94 at Portage to STH-29 [east] at Rothschild.)

 

 

It can be said the state of Wisconsin is being anything but "gung-ho" when it comes to I-39 in the state. While I-39 shields popped up like weeds along its actual route in the late-1990s (the signage is very good, in that respect), the further one gets away from the actual highway, references to I-39 seem to drop off drastically. Michael G. Koerner noted: "I-39 appears to be not much more than an annoyance to WisDOT, as they have made little more than a minimum effort to promote its existance. In the Stevens Point, WI area, for example, 'BUSINESS' and 'TO' US-51 signs very plentiful, but the *ONLY* mention of I-39 seems to be right at the interchanges while there is very little mention of I-39 at all, even on US-51 itself, in the Wausau area until the route actually begins."

 

 

While the triple concurrency of I-90/I-94/I-39 from Madison to Portage was not the first occurrence of a three-way Interstate routing in the nation—I-55/I-64/I-70 in East St Louis IL and St Louis MO holds that honor—Wisconsin's, though, is by far the longest.

 

 

In Wisconsin, under normal circumstances, no state trunkline highway number is duplicated, regardless of "Interstate," "US," or "State" designation. This "rule," though, was violated with the designation of I-39 in the state, as a STH-39 routing exists. In fact, a STH-39 designation has existed since the original numbered State Trunk Highway system was set up in 1917-1918! Breaking with tradition, the existing STH-39, running from Edmund to New Glarus in the southwestern part of the state, was not re-numbered. Mark Morrison from WisDOT wrote in to say, "It was felt that since STH 39 is geographically removed from I-39 and that STH 39 is mainly a local road carrying local traffic that there wouldn't be any confusion by motorists." At its closest point, STH-39 comes only within 25 miles (airline distance) of I-39 south of Madison, so any potential confusion is, indeed, very unlikely. —Thanks Mark!

 

 

Theoretically, I-39 could be extended northerly from Rothschild via the existing US-51 freeway past Wausau to Merril, where US-51 currently transitions from freeway to expressway, once the remaining low-clearance overpasses have been replaced in the Wausau area. WisDOT sources state, however, that the department has only considered extending I-39 northerly along the US-51/STH-29 concurrency to end the Interstate at the STH-29 WEST junction, once that interchange has been reconstructed in the coming years.

 

History:

While covered in the notes section above, I-39 was officially designated on October 16, 1992 while actual route markers did no appear on the highway until 1996. In late 1998, WisDOT began including I-39 on freeway signs between Portage and Beloit and Illinois and the ISTHA followed suit in 1999-2000 to "connect" the two I-39 routings.

 

Freeway:

Entire route.

 

NHS:

Entire route.

 

Continue on:

I-39 southerly into Illinois - via Rich Carlson's Illinois Highways website.
Interstate 39 - Charles Sarjeant's Illinois Highways Ends website.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

Interstate 39 @ Interstate-Guide.com - from the AARoads.com team.

 

 

Exit numbers on US 51 and I-39 - from WisDOT.

 

 

US 51/WIS 29 project - in the Wausau area, from WisDOT.


STH-39

Western Terminus:

US-18 just west of Edmund

Eastern Terminus:

STH-69 at cnr 6th Ave & STH-69 in New Glarus

Length:

43.02 miles

 

Map:

Route Map of STH-39

 

Notes:

In Wisconsin, under normal circumstances, no state trunkline highway number is duplicated, regardless of "Interstate," "US," or "State" designation. This "rule," though, was violated with the designation of I-39 in the state, as a STH-39 routing exists. In fact, a STH-39 designation has existed since the original numbered State Trunk Highway system was set up in 1917-1918! Breaking with tradition, the existing STH-39, running from Edmund to New Glarus in the southwestern part of the state, was not re-numbered. Mark Morrison from WisDOT wrote in to say, "It was felt that since STH 39 is geographically removed from I-39 and that STH 39 is mainly a local road carrying local traffic that there wouldn't be any confusion by motorists." At its closest point, STH-39 comes only within 25 miles (airline distance) of I-39 south of Madison, so any potential confusion is, indeed, very unlikely. —Thanks Mark!

 

History:

The first iteration of STH-39 in 1918 was from STH-16 (later STH-29) at Birnamwood to STH-14 (later US-8) at Pelican Lake. In the first major addition to the state trunkline system in 1919, the route was extended both southerly and northerly. Beginning at STH-15 (later US-41) between Oshkosh and Neenah, running via the present-day STH-76 (former US-45) corridor via Greenville to New London then via the present-day US-45 corridor from New London through Clintonville, Whittenberg and Antigo to Pelican Lake, where STH-39 was extended northwesterly via Rhinelander to end at STH-10 (now US-51) in Woodruff. By 1924, STH-26 had been extended northerly from Oshkosh to completely supplant STH-39 to Monico, while the remainder of STH-39 was replaced between Monico and Woodruff by an extension of STH-47 from Antigo. Immediately, the STH-39 designation was transferred to a new state trunkline route along its present-day corridor between Edmund and New Glarus, continuing southerly to Monticello then easterly via today's CTH-E to near Albany.

 

 

The easternmost 14.9 miles of STH-39 from New Glarus to STH-54 just west of Albany were removed in 1999. The 5.3-mile stretch of what was STH-39/STH-69 from New Glarus to Monticello retained the STH-69 designation, while the 9.6-mile stretch from Monticello to STH-54 was turned back to local control and redesignated CTH-F. This transfer occured at the same time as a northerly extension of STH-104 along the Monroe/Rock county line and may be related to that change.

 

Freeway/Expwy:

None.

 

Photographs:

 

 

Weblinks:

• None.


 

STH-30 | STH-31 | STH-32 | SPUR STH-32 | STH-33 | STH-34 | STH-35 | STH-36 | STH-37 | STH-38 | I-39 | STH-39 | Up to Top


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